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VP of Operations

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Date: Dec 17, 2010
RE: Stocking my Baseball Library
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1969Astroman wrote:

so he was an achoholic?



It's really one of the heartbreaking stories over the years.

Pete was described as a casual drinker, who would join teammates for a round after games.

After he returned from his military service, though, his conditioned worsened in so many ways.  He allegedly lapsed into heavy drinking to try to counter the pain from the debilitating effects of the epilepsy, not to mention the unwanted attention that it might bring.

In those days, many diseases were treated differently, and epilepsy was still considered to be some sort of demon affliction.

As it goes, according to what I've read, he was more comfortable being considered a drunk, than an epileptic.

After he was released by the Phillies at the beginning of the 1930 season, Alexander continued to tumble.  He signed on for a hitch with the touring House of David team.

His death certificate says he died of heart failure, but his wife, Amy, believes his death was caused by a fall, as he suffered into another seizure.

There are a couple of bios about Old Pete, and the SABR Bioproject entry, if you want a shorter version: http://bioproj.sabr.org/bioproj.cfm?a=v&v=l&bid=945&pid=140

Many fans today just don't realize the hardships even some of the game's brightest stars had to endure.

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



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I was lucky enough to read two great books -- Summer of '49, and The Teammates, by David Halberstam -- back-to-back.

I had just purchased The Teammates, and already had, but had not yet read, Summer of 49.

Summer is the story of the down-to-the-wire pennant chase between the Red Sox and Yankees.  Halberstam was a wonderful writer, full of great insight.  I often wondered what it was about baseball that kept drawing a Pulitzer Prize-winning author back for more.

The Teammates
is the poignant story of four members of that not-quite-great-enough Red Sox team -- Dom DiMaggio, Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky and Ted Williams -- and their lifelong friendship.

The book recounts DiMaggio's, Doerr's and Pesky's pilgrimage to Florida, shortly before Williams' death, the last time they would be together.  It's a heartwarming story of the bond between four men who were more than mere teammates.

Both books are excellent by themselves, but reading them together is a wonderful experience.  Boston's seven-game loss in 1947 to the St. Louis Cardinals, and second-place finish (by one game on the final day of the season) to the Yankees in '49 are part of baseball lore.

For a somewhat more offbeat read on those years, you might also want to give A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Cooperstown a shot.

It's the story of Mickey McDermott, the scattershot southpaw who was even wilder after the games, due to a serious drinking problem that ruined his career and his life.

McDermott came up as a Red Sox rookie in 1948, and was on board for the '49 pennant race.  He won 18 games for Boston in 1953, but was traded to the Senators after the season, because he was too difficult to control.

He wound up in Pinstripes two years later, then got shipped off to Detroit at the end of the season.  The Browns and A's completed his American League journey, and he was out of baseball after the '61 season.



-- Edited by seajaw on Sunday 19th of December 2010 03:50:12 AM

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



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Date: Dec 21, 2010
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While I was playing and writing up 1927 a couple of years ago, I read G.H. Fleming's Murderers' Row: The 1927 New York Yankees.

Fleming's book detailed the 1927 Yankee season, using original source material, with occasional annotations.

He culled the files and came up with Ford Frick, Grantland Rice, Paul Gallico, Fred Lieb, Damon Runyan, Ring Lardner and a host of others.

Babe Ruth returns to baseball from his off-season movie-making exploits, buff and ready to go.  He takes time to personally greet and introduce himself to all the newbies, and even throws batting practice.  Truly larger than life.

Fleming also used this approach to re-create two other seasons: 1908 (The Unforgettable Season - 1908: The Cubs, Giants and Pirates in the greatest race of all time) and 1934 (The Dizziest Season).

I found a copy of The Unforgettable Season at Half Price Books the other day.

I had noticed elsewhere that Christy Mathewson was sometimes held back from ace-vs.-ace matchups, and that he had a checkered history specifically against Mordecai Brown.

In leafing through The Unforgettable Season, I came across this tidbit from The New York Press:

"Mathewson started so splendily it seemed for a time "Big Six" would destroy the hoodoo that attaches itself to him every time he hooks up with Brown.  Since 1905 Matty has not beaten Brown."

This one is a hoot (W.W. Aulick, writing for The New York Times), as Johnny Evers disputes the results of a failed plate appearance against Matty:

"When Matty had puzzled him three times Umpire Klem made the customary decision.  Mr. Evers then spoke.  He spoke eloquently, pointedly, and for a long time.

"'Is that all?' asked Mr. Klem.

"'It is all I can think of now,' admitted Mr. Evers.'

"'Perhaps if you had a little leisure you could think of something more,' said the umpire kindly.  'Suppose you go over to that nice quiet clubhouse for the rest of the afternoon and think up some more things.  You may tell them to me Monday.'"

Priceless.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



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Date: Dec 22, 2010
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We're going to go backwards for this entry.

I was reading Tall Tactician's post about Field of Dreams.  A copy of part of the shooting script is included in the pullouts in the book Treasures of Major League Baseball.

I decided to try to take some pictures of the script segment, and a few other items from the book, just to show what is inside:



-- Edited by seajaw on Wednesday 22nd of December 2010 04:12:18 AM

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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And, a few close-ups:



This next one is a copy of a promissory note for $25,000, from the New York Yankees to Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee.  This was part of the transfer of Babe Ruth from the Red Sox to New York.



Jackie Robinson's letter to New York Giants' owner Horace Stoneham, notifying the Giants' owner of his retirement from the game.

Robinson had just been informed of his trade from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Giants.  In hindsight, it seems kinda sacrilegious, Robinson playing for the Giants?



 



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



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Date: Dec 24, 2010
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Evidently, the book format that includes removable replica collectibles is a popular thing these days.

I found another such book: America's Game.  The copy for the book is written by Tim Kurkjian.

It's pretty basic stuff, as books go, but the main thing is the replica materials included:

* Filled-out scorecards from 1884 (a game between St. Louis and the Metropolitans), and the Cardinals-Expos game Sept. 27, 1998 in which Mark McGwire hit his 69th and 70th home runs.

* The handwritten lyrics to Take Me Out to the Ball Game.

* A handwritten letter (in addressed envelope) from Buck Weaver to Commissioner Ford Frick, asking for reinstatement.

* The official league document showing the transfer of Babe Ruth from the Red Sox to the Yankees (including the backside, which features all the rules of player transfers).

* Two replica tickets to the 1949 All-Star Game at Ebbets Field (Box C Seats 58, 59 -- priced at $5 each)

* President Roosevelt's letter (again, in envelope, on White House stationary) to Commissioner Landis, telling Landis to start the '42 season, despite the War.

* The scouting report on three players, one, a young shortstop named Mickey Mantle (GENERAL REMARKS; Is not now a good shortstop - good enough as hitter to enter AAA.  Don't believe he is capable of playing short in AAA.  If must play short, would recommend Class B - possibly A.).

* Scorecard/program (not filled out) for a Negro American League game between the Chicago American Giants and the Birmingham Black Barons.  Batting second and playing center field: Willie Mays, known as "Buck Dust."

* Handwritten letter from Jackie Robinson to a fan, defending the integration of Major League Baseball.

* A note from Curt Flood to Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, telling Kuhn that he will not report to the Philadelphia Phillies, and that he feels he should be able to consider other offers for his services.

Of course, these are all replicas, as were the items in the other books I've described earlier in this thread.  Again, though, it is so tantalizing to see these items represented.

I may never get to Cooperstown, but this brings the history of the game a lot closer.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

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Date: Dec 24, 2010
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seajaw wrote:

 

Evidently, the book format that includes removable replica collectibles is a popular thing these days.

I found another such book: America's Game.  The copy for the book is written by Tim Kurkjian.

It's pretty basic stuff, as books go, but the main thing is the replica materials included:

* Filled-out scorecards from 1884 (a game between St. Louis and the Metropolitans), and the Cardinals-Expos game Sept. 27, 1998 in which Mark McGwire hit his 69th and 70th home runs.

* The handwritten lyrics to Take Me Out to the Ball Game.

* A handwritten letter (in addressed envelope) from Buck Weaver to Commissioner Ford Frick, asking for reinstatement.

* The official league document showing the transfer of Babe Ruth from the Red Sox to the Yankees (including the backside, which features all the rules of player transfers).

* Two replica tickets to the 1949 All-Star Game at Ebbets Field (Box C Seats 58, 59 -- priced at $5 each)

* President Roosevelt's letter (again, in envelope, on White House stationary) to Commissioner Landis, telling Landis to start the '42 season, despite the War.

* The scouting report on three players, one, a young shortstop named Mickey Mantle (GENERAL REMARKS; Is not now a good shortstop - good enough as hitter to enter AAA.  Don't believe he is capable of playing short in AAA.  If must play short, would recommend Class B - possibly A.).

* Scorecard/program (not filled out) for a Negro American League game between the Chicago American Giants and the Birmingham Black Barons.  Batting second and playing center field: Willie Mays, known as "Buck Dust."

* Handwritten letter from Jackie Robinson to a fan, defending the integration of Major League Baseball.

* A note from Curt Flood to Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, telling Kuhn that he will not report to the Philadelphia Phillies, and that he feels he should be able to consider other offers for his services.

Of course, these are all replicas, as were the items in the other books I've described earlier in this thread.  Again, though, it is so tantalizing to see these items represented.

I may never get to Cooperstown, but this brings the history of the game a lot closer.

 



Jeff.....I know you are a West Coast guy, but I can't believe in all your years, you have never been to Cooperstown.

It is located about a 3 hour drive from me.......absolutely amazing place (as is the field, which you are allowed to venture on).  Puts the football HOF to total shame.........

 



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



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Date: Dec 24, 2010
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Budget constraints, mostly.

I'd also love to make it to the Negro League Baseball Museum (fortunately, I met Buck O'Neil several years ago), and SOM HQ.

Even though I've never been to SOM Mecca, I do have a treasured e-mail from Hal (not quite the same as a real letter, though).

I sent a writeup about Strat Park to Glenn Guzzo at the old SOM site. He posted it, and included all 13 pictures I sent! The article is still in the archives at the revamped site, but the pics are gone.

Anyway, I had also sent an e-mail to Hal, on another matter.

I included some pics of Strat Park, and he replied that my ballpark was "awesome".

I had attained "Geek Heaven!"

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

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Date: Dec 24, 2010
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seajaw wrote:

Budget constraints, mostly.

I'd also love to make it to the Negro League Baseball Museum (fortunately, I met Buck O'Neil several years ago), and SOM HQ.

Even though I've never been to SOM Mecca, I do have a treasured e-mail from Hal (not quite the same as a real letter, though).

I sent a writeup about Strat Park to Glenn Guzzo at the old SOM site. He posted it, and included all 13 pictures I sent! The article is still in the archives at the revamped site, but the pics are gone.

Anyway, I had also sent an e-mail to Hal, on another matter.

I included some pics of Strat Park, and he replied that my ballpark was "awesome".

I had attained "Geek Heaven!"



If you ever decide to visit Cooperstown , let me know!

 



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

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Date: Dec 24, 2010
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nacster wrote:

seajaw wrote:

Budget constraints, mostly.

I'd also love to make it to the Negro League Baseball Museum (fortunately, I met Buck O'Neil several years ago), and SOM HQ.

Even though I've never been to SOM Mecca, I do have a treasured e-mail from Hal (not quite the same as a real letter, though).

I sent a writeup about Strat Park to Glenn Guzzo at the old SOM site. He posted it, and included all 13 pictures I sent! The article is still in the archives at the revamped site, but the pics are gone.

Anyway, I had also sent an e-mail to Hal, on another matter.

I included some pics of Strat Park, and he replied that my ballpark was "awesome".

I had attained "Geek Heaven!"



If you ever decide to visit Cooperstown , let me know!

 



I'll do that!

Thanks.

 



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Twice each year, the Seattle Public Library's Friends of the Library organization holds a book sale, and what a sale it is!

The Friends hold these popular sales to raise money for the Seattle Public Librarys.  In these days of drastic budget shortfalls across the nation, any little bit helps.

I have been to five or six of these sales, and it's a joy to behold so many people who still exhibit a love for real books!  To be sure, there are always those looking for re-sale material, but the vast majority, I would like to think, buy for their own personal pleasure.  I know I do.

Some of the books are former library books, with their checkout cards and stampings.  That's fine for me, as I collect  to (eventually) read them.  I'm not worried about resale value.

Some others are store remainders, donated to support a worthy cause.  And still others are gently (or not-so-gently, in some cases) used books.

Hard-bound editions generally go for a dollar; paperbacks are .50.  There are also the "better books," which are nicer and/or older editions (some autographed), which cost a bit more.  Also, cds/dvds, and other odds and ends.

I have found many wonderful additions for my personal library at these sales.  Here are a just a few:

I'll start with Sultans of Swat, a New York Times compilation of accounts from the careers of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle.

I also picked up a book about the Babe -- Babe Ruth -- one of the old Grosset Sports Library series.  It was written by former New York sportswriter Tom Meany back in 1947 (this one is a second printing from 1951).  No heavy lifting, the Grosset series was pretty-much standard fare juvenile sports books.  Still, it's fun to revisit those days, now and then.

Robert F. Burk's Never Just a Game is a study of baseball management, players and the economics and labor relations of the game, from the earliest days up to 1920.  The business of baseball.

In keeping with the theme of the early years, I grabbed a copy of When Chicago Ruled Baseball, by Bernard A.Weisberger.  This one's specifically about the Cubs-White Sox World Series of 1906.  The 116-win Cubs, and the Hitless Wonders (team BA: .230) from the South Side.

Pulitzer Prize-winner Dave Anderson's book Pennant Races details 15 historic pennant chases, starting with 1908.  Also included are '20, '34, '38, '40, '41, '48, '49, '51, '64, '67, '78, '91 and 1993.

Baseball Memories is a paean to the '50's.  It's "an illustrated scrapbook of baseball's fabulous '50's" by Marc Okkonen.  The book is broken into sections, featuring commentary and pictures of the ballparks, broadcasters, the writers and their papers' banners; and the players and managers of each of the teams from that decade, and capsules of each of the 10 seasons, through 1959.

When the Cheering Stops is an interesting look at players' lives and how they've moved on after leaving the game.  Twenty-one different players from the '40's, '50's, '60's and '70's wrote passages for the book.  The 21 are: Mel Parnell, Dale Long, Bob "Hurricane" Hazel, Ray Boone, Bobby Thomson, Clem Labine, Davey Williams, J.W. Porter, Roy Seivers, Bob Boyd, Chuck Stobbs, Bill Bruton, Al Smith, Elroy Face, Tom Tresh, Dick Ellsworth, Bob Veale, Jake Gibbs, Gary Peters, Al Weis, and Eddie Kranepool.

The Pride of Havana
is Roberto Gonzales Echevarria's history of Cuban Baseball.  Cuba has been a hotbed of base ball for well over 100 years.  John McGraw's Giants used to hold Spring Training on the Caribbean isle.

The Negro Leagues also had heavy Cuban participation, when darker skins kept many of the island's stars from the Major Leagues.  Lighter-skinned players did manage to filter into the big leagues over the years.  But the color barrier kept Major League crowds from seeing some of the greatest players of the century, many who found a home in the Negro Leagues, and made the Hall of Fame via that route.

The Ballplayers, a thumbnail-sketch-format reference book detailing the careers of more than 6,000 former Major League players and managers.  There are also entries on Negro League players, teams, writers, broadcasters, umpires, owners, scouts, ballparks.

James A. Riley's Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues.  

Baseball: The Presidents' Game, by William B. Mead and Paul Dickson.  As the cover blurb reads, "Brims with terrific anecdotes and wonderfully memorable photographs featuring baseball, presidents, and the nation's capital."

Walter Johnson had a collection of five baseballs, signed by Presidential first-pitch chuckers (Taft, Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover), and another from Teddy Roosevelt.  The collection was sent to the Hall of Fame in 1968 by his son, Edwin.

Ten years later, when Johnson's grandson, Henry, was doing research for a biography on the life of the Big Train, it was discovered that the collection of presidentially-signed baseballs was gone.  After three requests to see the baseballs, it was finally admitted that had been stolen from the Hall!  Officials did not want to publicly admit to it, for fear that other treasures might be taken.

Jim Reisler's The Best Game Ever - Pirates vs. Yankees, October 13, 1960.  Game Seven, in all its glory.

Harvey Frommer's Old-Time Baseball is a look back into 1800's, featuring all kinds of tasty tidbits and biographical information on the stars of that era.

Baseball In the Afternoon - Tales From a Bygone Era, by Robert Smith, is another collection of stories from the Old School.

Cynthia J. Wilber produced a collection of reminisces called For the Love of the Game.  The book features the results of a series of conversations with the likes of Joe Black, Ted Williams, Ben Chapman, Johnny Vander Meer, Monte Irvin, Bobby Doerr, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial and many others, to give you an idea of the scope.  Sort of like a '30's-'40's-'50's version of The Glory of Their Times.

Like Glory, it's edited to read like a written history by each player.  Certainly interesting for anyone who is playing that era of Strat.

Imagine a roundtable discussion with the greats of the game, each analyzing his particular niche in the game -- defense, batting, pitching, whatever.  That's what Joseph Wallace has created with The Autobiography of Baseball.

Utilizing quotes from articles, biographies/autobiographies, never-before-published interviews and other sources, Wallace has created the impression of a gathering of the Legends, allowing their comments to create the semblance of a Great Debate on the game.

Imagine comparing notes between Tris Speaker and Willie Mays on the art of chasing down a fly ball.  What's the best way to grip a bat?  See what Babe Ruth and Tony Gwynn had/have to say on that topic.

Baserunning is covered through dissertations by Ty Cobb, Max Carey, Cool Papa Bell, Joe Morgan, and others.

Everything is covered: scoring runs, pitching, fielding, hitting.  The history of segregation and prejudice in the game is discussed -- from the Irish, to Native Americans, African-Americans, Jews, Italians, Hispanics -- with comments drawn from the likes of Hank Greenberg, Jackie Robinson, Chief Bender, Juan Marichal, Willie Stargell, and others.

Playing with pain...knowing when to hang 'em up...you name it.

Memories of Summer is a Roger Kahn collection of stories spanning the '40's, 50's and '60's.

Just reading about Leo Durocher's response to the writer who asked if Willie's catch in the '54 Series was the greatest catch he's ever made is a hoot.  This was just after the game, and Leo the Lip's response is a treasure.

I can't repeat it here (this is Leo we're talking about...).

Even earlier in the book is a passage recounting an early exhibition game in which Kahn sat next to Tris Speaker, as the Grey Eagle observed the young Mays.

"He'll do."

I don't normally buy second copies of books I already have, but I did grab Susan E. Johnson's When Women Played Hardball, recounting the days of the All-American Girls Professional baseball League.

It was signed by the author and seven AAGPBL players.  Hidden treasure.  Fifty cents.

The Curse of Rocky Colavito (updated through the cursed 1994 season) by Terry Pluto.

I found a hardbound edition of one of my favorite reference books: Diamonds - The Evolution of the Ballpark, by Michael Gershwin.

My trade softcover edition was getting a bit (!) worn.

This lavishly-illustrated book is great for reading about the history of ballpark construction, and features some great historical photos, as well as illustrations of many pre-1900 ballyards.

A.G. Spalding and the Rise of Baseball, by Peter Levine.

I have read the Charles Alexander bio of Ty Cobb, and I'm aware of the book written by Al Stump, but I was not aware of a third Cobb bio, by John D. McCallum, so I picked that one up, as well.

100 Years of Major League Baseball - American and National Leagues, 1901-2000, by David Nemec and Saul Wisnia.

The Baseball Chronology, edited by James Charlton.  Just opening the book to a random page brings me to this interesting selection, from Aug. 20th, 1901:

Umpire Bob Emslie becomes ill before the 2nd game of the Superbas-Phils twin bill.  Phils P Al Orth and Superbas C Jim McGuire fill in for him.  However, it is a close game, and Orth is needed as a PH in the 9th.  Doc White then becomes the second umpire as Orth hits a single and scores a run.  Brooklyn holds on for a 3-2 win.

Talk about the "honor system".  Just try to imagine that happening today!

I also picked up a copy of Jackie Robinson's autobiography, I Never Had It Made.  With all the books I do have, it's surprising I didn't have a copy of that one.

The last trip I made was special, because it gave me a chance to link up with fellow SOMer, TerryB.

It's always fun to hook up like that.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Jan 5, 2011
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I was rummaging around a local thrift shop and found Baseball Extra, an assortment of baseball-themed newspaper front pages from the collection of Eric C. Caren.

The book contains 437 pages of pics, going all the way back to 1857, when the pictures were printed from engravings.

There is so much to explore here, including various World Series matchups, great player retirements and passings.

The front page of the Jan. 6, 1920 Boston Post blares "BABE RUTH SOLD TO THE YANKEES".

Going back to before 1900, the engravings selected for inclusion are wonderful.  Team pictures, individuals, action recreations.

"A HEAVY STREAK OF BATTING", the caption proclaims below one picture, continuing "Sketch from the rear of the catcher's position at the great base-ball match between the Athletic and Philadelphia clubs at Philadelphia".

Another (illustrated from a photograph), is a team picture of the Providence Base-Ball Club of 118, featuring Harry Wright, George Wright and Hoss Radbourne, among others.

The 1894 Champion Orioles club is featured in another picture.

Ty Cobb's 4,000th hit is among the major achievements noted.

The Oct. 24, 1945 edition of the Brooklyn Herald's sportsd pages is topped with the headline "Negro Ace Standout Prospect" and features the sub-head "Dodgers scouted Robinson for Big-League role".

Other supporting acticles include "Rickey Signs Negro Amid Complications", "Boro Leaders Support Rickey's Move" and "Robinson worth 50-G's, KC owner says".  That last is a reference to Kansas City Monarchs owner Tom Baird.

There's a picture of Willie mays in Army fatigues on the front of the Mar. 19, 1953 edition of the New York Daily Mirror, after learning his request for a dependancy discharge had been turned down.

The Sunday Mirror from Oct. 3, 1954 trumpets the Giants' four-game World Series sweep with a huge photo of Mays and pitcher Paul Giel (with his arm around Mays' shoulders) joyfully singing together in the shower.

Oh, there is so much more.  From 1857 to the Yankees' 1999 World Series triumph.

What a collection!

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Manager

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That looks like a great book to sift through and see how the papers of the day saw what to us is now history.

What a find.

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I wanted to play more SOM so I retired.

 



VP of Operations

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I have also been ordering a lot from amazon.com in recent months, as the library continues to grow.

Fifty-Nine in '84 is the story of "Old Hoss" Radbourne's 59-victory 1884 campaign, and baseball life in a very brutal era.

I was wincing at two photos in the book, showing the hands of catcher Doug Allison.  Remember, backstops were barehanded, just like everyone else, and routinely set up a good 5-10 feet behind the dish, which was just 45 feet from the pitching rubber.

To give a frame of reference, the current distance from the rubber to the plate in Little League ball is 46 ft.

I can't show the pics, but just imagine what they look like, knowing the pictures were provided for the book courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.  Fingers askew, bent in different directions, heavy callouses.  Ugh!

1921 tells the story of the season that ended with the first of three consecutive Giants-Yanks World Series, as John McGraw is beginning to lose his ironclad grip on New York to the mighty Babe Ruth.

Chasing Moonlight -- The True Story of Field of Dreams' Moonlight Graham, by Brett Friedlander

Pitching In a Pinch: Or, Baseball From the Inside, by Christy Mathewson

The Original Curse: Did the Cubs Throw the 1918 World Series to Babe Ruth's Red Sox and Incite the 1919 World Series Scandal?, by Scott Deveney

A Game of Brawl: The Orioles, the Beaneaters, and the Battle for the 1897 Pennant, by Bill Felber

Willie's Boys: The 1948 Birmingham Black Barons, the Last Negro League World Series, and the Making of a Baseball Legend, by John Klima

Chief Bender's Burden, by Tom Swift, a biography of the great Athletics' hurler.

Where They Ain't is Burt Solomon's book about the original Baltimore Orioles, the late 1800's club that included Wee Willie Keeler, John McGraw, Wilbert Robinson, and Joe Kelly (among other colorful characters).

The Beer and Whiskey League, by David Nemec, tells the story of the American Association.  For 10 years, 1882-'91, the AA challenged the National League for equal status as a Major League.

Those are surely going to be fun, informative reads.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Third Base Coach

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Posts: 5563
Date: Jan 12, 2011
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I have 59 in '84 , 1921 and the beer and whiskey league . i especially liked the beer and whiskey league , lots of great photos and surprisingly a good amount of stats from that era . i do have the original curse on my wishlist , seems like an interesting read .

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Go Bucs !!!

No-hitters- Ray Culp , Freddy Garcia , Phil Ortega , Scott Kazmir , Needle Nose Wright , A.J. Griffin , Carlos Torres , Stan Bahnsen , Mario Soto

Perfect games - Jamie Moyer , J. R. Richard , Sandy Koufax

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