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VP of Operations

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Posts: 16185
Date: Dec 11, 2010
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Last year, a Seattle company, Ebbets Field Flannels helped design/provide jerseys for the fledgling Iraqi national baseball team.

This was following an item carried on the Rachel Maddow Show, about how the country was trying to rebuild, in the wake of its civil war.  There was a huge outpouring of support for the team, which essentially had something like one jersey, a ball and a bat.

I made it a point to stop by EFF one day, when I was in the area, to say I was touched by their support of the Iraqi effort.  To say the least, I was instantly smitten with their product line.

The company specializes in older minor league, Federal League, Latin, and Negro League jerseys (no MLB licensing, sadly, though they have done Turn Back the Clock re-creations of old jerseys for the Mariners).  Their selection goes back as far as the late-1800's (Cleveland Spiders, Boston Beaneaters, the original Baltimore Orioles, etc.).

In the last nine months, I have bought seven, each an authentic re-creation of a minor league or Negro League jersey from an era pre-synthetics.

Here's what I have, thus far:

1936 Milwaukee Brewers road jersey

1939 Philadelphia Stars road jersey

1939 Seattle Rainiers home jersey

1940 New York Cubans home jersey

1941 Jersey City Giants road jersey

1943 Memphis Red Sox road jersey

1920 Detroit Stars home jersey



The '39 Philly Stars jersey was first.  When I visited the store, they had one on display.  It was an XL (alas, I'm a heftier XXL), so I asked my son (who was born in Philly) if he wanted it.  Without hesitation, he said "yes," and I then ordered one for myself.

We have since worn them to several Mariners' games:

robandme0001.jpg

These jerseys are thoroughly researched, and made-to-order with great love and affection.  They are pricey (about $188 each), but I have managed to buy each of mine when they were either on sale, or off-the-rack (reduced price for in-store, off-the-rack, purchases).

The feel of the flannel is wonderful.  There is a true "new-car" kind of a rush when I put one on for the first time.

While I might not want to bake in 90-100 degree St. Louis-style heat and humidity while wearing one, they are wonderful for our local climate.  They also do fitted caps, and a line of t-shirts, based on designs from things such as team stationary letterhead.

I haven't yet "suited up" for any of my Strat games, but I like wearing them around when I go out.  A great way to show one's appreciation for the history of the game.

For anyone interested, here's the Ebbets Field Flannels link:

(http://www.ebbets.com/category/BaseballJerseys/a)



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Third Base Coach

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Date: Dec 13, 2010
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Cool stuff!

I assume your son will be posting here.  BYW, the threads look great.


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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



VP of Operations

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Date: Dec 13, 2010
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Tall Tactician wrote:

Cool stuff!

I assume your son will be posting here.  BYW, the threads look great.



Thanks.

Sad to say, my son's gaming time is usually spent on stuff like Yuhgioh, Magic, and Dungeons and Dragons.

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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Feb 4, 2011
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Ebbets Field Flannels has introduced some new Negro League jerseys, and is holding a sale during February, to coincide with Black History Month.

One of the jerseys I'm thinking about is the 1910 Lincoln Giants, one of the great pre-NNL black clubs.

The 1927 Brooklyn Royal Giants (Eastern Colored League) also looks great.

They also have hats, and a new series of t-shirts.

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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Season Ticket Holder - Lower Deck

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Posts: 258
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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I have a collection of old time stadiums produced by the Danbury Mint. They are all wood based and are correct in every possible way up to including the advertising on the walls and the light standards. They were one of my baseball collection items that I got to "keep" when I was removed from my house. I leave them about my apt.to create more of an "ambience" for my Strat game. I once had an exit gate from Forbes Field but it was lost when I became homeless for a year.

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mrpuna


General Manager

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Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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Jeff, how old is that strapping young man pictured with you?

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"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Season Ticket Holder - Lower Deck

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Posts: 258
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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Oh! My son was a professional Yuhgouh player and did quite well at it. His collection was worth about $750 when he finally sold it. It used to kill me to pay a few dollars for a pack of cards and I remembered how great it was when Baseball cards cost a nickel.Just another kids hobby ruined by greedy adults.

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mrpuna


VP of Operations

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Date: Feb 17, 2011
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nacster wrote:

Jeff, how old is that strapping young man pictured with you?



That "strapping young man" (I feel older with each passing letter I type) turned 17 two months after that picture was taken.

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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seajaw wrote:

 

nacster wrote:

Jeff, how old is that strapping young man pictured with you?



That "strapping young man" (I feel older with each passing letter I type) turned 17 two months after that picture was taken.

 



Mine are 22 (23 in June) and 6 (just turned last week).

 



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16185
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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mrpuna,

We try so hard to recapture what we had as children, but fail because we've lost the innocence that makes youthfuness what it is.

Only a kid could offer up almost his entire collection -- Mantle, Koufax, you name it -- for Joe Shlabotnik.

We are corrupt.  Too often, the value we place on our possessions is monetary.

A nickel pack of gum cards is cool to us, but that thought co-exists right next to the one that begins, "If only I had a time machine..."

Can we truthfully say we wouldn't go back to buy up all the Topps card packs with the Mantle rookies because of what we know them to be worth on the collectors' market?

Could we go back, just for the thrill of buying one pack (and a soda pop) at the corner store, then return home?

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Season Ticket Holder - Lower Deck

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Posts: 258
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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Well put Seajaw-accurant and eloquent at the same time. Any time I feel that my childhood was totally deprived me I think I'll go back and read this again. At least I got my Strat stuff back and can either play or talk about our shared hobby. Thanks for sharing your wisdom with me and the other posters.

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mrpuna


General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 17, 2011
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seajaw wrote:

mrpuna,

We try so hard to recapture what we had as children, but fail because we've lost the innocence that makes youthfuness what it is.

Only a kid could offer up almost his entire collection -- Mantle, Koufax, you name it -- for Joe Shlabotnik.

We are corrupt.  Too often, the value we place on our possessions is monetary.

A nickel pack of gum cards is cool to us, but that thought co-exists right next to the one that begins, "If only I had a time machine..."

Can we truthfully say we wouldn't go back to buy up all the Topps card packs with the Mantle rookies because of what we know them to be worth on the collectors' market?

Could we go back, just for the thrill of buying one pack (and a soda pop) at the corner store, then return home?




I'm not gonna lie, I often think about how many 60's and 70's rookies ended up in my buddy's driveway in puddles, in the spokes of my bike, crammed into a flimsy shoebox bound with rubber bands, etc.

 

My first year buying cards myself was 1971, the cards with the cool black borders, but I always traded cards with older kids that had them from before 1971.  Dunno how many Schmidt, Fisk, Yount etc rookies I had.  Not to mention the hard to obtain "late series" cards.

 

We didn't care about the names really.  We knew Aaron, Mays, Killebrew, Palmer, Jackson, etc.......but we had no clue about the Kessinger's, Alou's, Carty's, etc.  Only until I started to REALLY get into Strat (1974-1975) did I put the names with the stats (I started playing in 1971, but didn't start buying new cards every year...in 1973 I spilt the cost with my buddy who got me into it, 1974 was the first year I bought cards with my own newspaper route money).

 

In addition, every year I would take my glove to Silver Stadium a few times a year to get autographs of the local AAA team (Rochester) players on my glove.  The 3 best ones I got were Eddie Murray, Don Baylor, and Bobby Grich (of course Ron Shelton of "Bull Durham" fame was a pretty good one in hindsight, even though he was only about a .205 hitter).



-- Edited by nacster on Thursday 17th of February 2011 07:19:21 PM

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16185
Date: May 8, 2011
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Oh, what great luck!

The Seattle Childrens Theater has produced a stage play of Dan Gutman's book Jackie & Me.

Guttman has penned a series of novels for young readers about a young man, Joe Stoshack, who possesses the ability to visit the different eras of the players in his baseball card collection. Honus & Me, Babe & Me, and Shoeless Joe & Me, are some of the other books in the series..

Jackie & Me, of course, takes him back to when Jackie Robinson was breaking in with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

The series seems to have gained almost universally-outstanding reviews (based on my sampling of Amazon customer comments). And Jackie & Me seems to have provided a great medium for teaching younger readers about the terrible racism that Blacks faced in that era.

The reason why the book/play becomes a topic of interest in the Threads thread is this: the uniforms for the performers were crafted by Ebbets Field Flannels, the same folks whose love of the game is shown in the jerseys already featured above.

As before, they have perfectly recreated the Brooklyn Dodger jerseys of the era for the play.

And I was lucky enough to score one that they had left over at their shop!

I don't have any pics yet, but I will be sure to get one posted.

The jerseys were made to mid-'50's specs. The number on my jersey is 12, which could mean either Frank Kellert ('55) or Jim Gentile ('57).

If we use a little creative license, and look to the '47 roster (Jackie's rookie year), #12 was the Brat, Eddie Stanky.

Stanky did not like Robinson at first, and told him so. When Robinson was being harrassed badly one day by the Phillies, however, it was Stanky who came to his defense.

Stanky's Southern upbringing may have left him to be predisposed to not wanting a Black teammate. But then again, Stanky was known for being gruff generally.

A passage in Jonathan Eig's book, Opening Day, may describe it best:

"Stanky might not have liked it, but then again, he didn't pretend to like much of anything. He was a baseball man to the marrow, and any peculiar emotions that might have crept in as a result of his new association with a black teammate would not distract him from the game. From the season's start, he proved a comfort on the field to Robinson, helping to set his position before each pitch, telling him when to shade batter toward the line and when to move toward the hole between first and second. Later, Robinson would say he was sorry for making the initial assumption that the second baseman was a bigot. "Stanky, although he was from the South, or raised down there, was a guy that took up battles, and a guy I respected...He was gruff, but helpful."

In accounts written shortly after the end of the '47 season, Branch Rickey and Robinson both rated Stanky as Robinson's earliest important backer.

Nice. A little history with my jersey.



-- Edited by seajaw on Sunday 8th of May 2011 01:52:56 PM

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Third Base Coach

Status: Online
Posts: 6297
Date: May 8, 2011
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Maybe your crystal ball doesn't work so well, but I'd hold onto that luck rabbit's foot.  What a find!  Congrats on your latest acquisition.



__________________

Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Lower Deck - Behind Home Plate Ticket

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Posts: 106
Date: May 16, 2011
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seajaw wrote:
Tall Tactician wrote:

Cool stuff!

I assume your son will be posting here.  BYW, the threads look great.



Thanks.

Sad to say, my son's gaming time is usually spent on stuff like Yuhgioh, Magic, and Dungeons and Dragons.


 

Dungeons and Dragons rocks

I spent the better part of my childhood on D&D.  That and Strat, APBA, and whatever else was dice-based.

Played D&D on into university as well, and into my adult years.  Gave it up after I got married.  Didn't have enough time for it.  LOL

 

TTYL,

Trav



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