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Post Info TOPIC: Collecting baseball's past
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VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 6, 2016
RE: Collecting baseball's past
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Nitrous Oxide wrote:

Seajaw,

What do you do with this stuff? Do you have it on display in your Strat basement?


I am slowly getting some of my stuff framed for display.

I have a few items on the wall already.  For one section of wall space, I am currently working on getting a number of pieces framed.  I'll measure out the spacing and get them hung as soon as the various items are finished.  That won't be for another few months, however.

The cost of professional framing limits what I can get done.  On my budget, it's a slow process.  Sometimes, it comes down to bidding on items I want to add to the collection, versus spending the money to get another item framed.

The smaller items, such as scorecards and programs, are in plastic sheets with backing boards, and stored in binders.  I currently have eight binders, with each one representing a category of collectables (programs/scorecards, team-issued newsletters, correspondence, minor leagues, etc.).

And there is a lot of stuff that is too large/bulky to be stored in binders, such as the Heilbroner Baseball Blue Books and Year & Note Books (I'll post pics of those items in the near future).

You can also see some of the items I have, in the photo headers of my more recent replays.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Aug 7, 2016
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The Art of Baseball, Pt. 4

I have to admit I know absolutely nothing about the Sketch-O-Rama series of sports editorial cartoons, other than the fact that I have seen four of them on eBay.

The artist is Art Fish (which may be a pseudonym, I don't know...).

I welcome any more information from anyone familiar with this series.  I can't even find anything on google.

This is the one piece I bought.  It's a preview of the 1963 World Series, between the Yankees and the Dodgers:

20160803_215848.jpg



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Third Base Coach

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Date: Aug 8, 2016
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Interesting piece.  Surprised that the nickname bums was still being applied to the Dodger in 1963.  This would lead me to think it ran in a New York/Brooklyn newspaper, but it is just speculation.



-- Edited by Tall Tactician on Monday 8th of August 2016 12:12:35 AM

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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



VP of Operations

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Date: Aug 8, 2016
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Tall Tactician wrote:

Interesting piece.  Surprised that the nickname bums was still being applied to the Dodger in 1963.  This would lead me to think it ran in a New York/Brooklyn newspaper, but it is just speculation.



-- Edited by Tall Tactician on Monday 8th of August 2016 12:12:35 AM


I've seen several others, as I mentioned.

One was from '66, centered around Frank Robinson and the Baltimore Orioles, and another was highlighting the upcoming '63 All-Star Game. 



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Aug 8, 2016
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The Art of Baseball, Pt. 5

Okay, today we have another unknown.

When I bid on these items, the seller said they were done by an artist named Clarence Young, who worked for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, presumably back in the 1930's, given the subject matter of the two illustrations.

He had no further details.

I did a google search and could come up with nothing on a sports artist or cartoonist named Clarence Young.  Maybe he worked in the art department, but was never a bylined contributor.

Regardless, the art itself is outstanding, and dovetailed very nicely with the seasons I was playing.  I'm glad I have it, even if it was never published.

The first of the two is a piece highlighting pitcher Joe Bowman, who twirled for six teams -- most notably the Pirates -- from 1932-'45.  Bowman was also a capable batsman, who was often used as a pinch hitter.  In 1939, he batted .344 for the Pirates and drove in 18 runs in 96 at bats.  That's some serious production.

20160803_215541.jpg

The second one features Pirates starters Cy Blanton and Waite Hoyt.  Blanton must have been up-and-coming at the time, because the blurb talks about a one-hit effort against the Cardinals that seems to have helped cement his status as a starter.

Hoyt's caption tells of how he was taught the slider by former Bucs twirler Heinie Meinie.

This piece is a little more beat-up than the Bowman page, but it's still a treat.

20160803_215702 (2).jpg

Again, I have no idea who this "Clarence Young" was.  But he was obviously quite talented. 



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 9, 2016
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The Art of Baseball, Pt. 6

Stay on the theme of unknown artists, we go international.

This is a relatively simple, hand-illustrated, Puerto Rican advertisement for Coca-Cola.  It's from 1951 and features former Major League infielder Gil Torres, shown here wearing a Habana Leones' hat.

Even the "Coca-Cola" was done by hand (perhaps with a stencil).

The Cuban-born Torres played parts of four seasons years in the bigs, with the Washington Senators.  All told, he played 21 years.  His tour with the Leones lasted from 1948-'51 when he was sent to the Miami Sun Sox.  Both clubs were part of the Class-B Florida-International League.

Torres bounced around an array of circuits, such as the Georgia-Florida League, the Piedmont League, the Mexican League, the Southern Association, the American Association, and the International League.  He played with the Montreal Royals in 1947, one year after Jackie Robinson.

The art is pretty bad shape, with a piece torn off and various tears.  But I felt that it was worth having, given the age, and the fact that it was from Puerto Rico.  The seller had already sold several others of different players.

20160803_215951 (2).jpg



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 10, 2016
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The Art of Baseball, Pt. 7

Mario DeMarco was a renowned illustrator for nearly 70 years, specializing in western and sports heroes.

His renderings of Hall of Fame baseball players (the Callahan set) are legendary collectables.  There is a wide array of his work available on eBay right now.

http://www.bobnolan-sop.net/Reflections/Reflections%20htms/deMarco,%20Mario.htm

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Cartoonist,+illustrator+dead+at+86%3B+DeMarco+drew+Hall+of+Famers,...-a0176039663

http://www.psacard.com/articles/articleview/5376/psa-set-registry-hall-fame-heaven-look-1950-callahan-baseball-card

http://www.navsource.org/archives/06/images/06021063/0602106390.jpg

Given my budget, however, I was forced to settle for a single, small-ish, sample of his work.  But it's a nice one, looking back at two baseball greats: Jackie Robinson and Judy Johnson.

This is one I already had framed and hanging on the wall in the Strat Cave:

20160807_195453 (2).jpg



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VIP Season Ticket Holder

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Posts: 398
Date: Aug 10, 2016
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Really nice additions to the Seahall!



__________________

If it weren't for Honey,I'd never have come back to the hobby...Thanks,Anne!..God rest your soul.

Much Love,

Your husband, 

 

Jimmie 

 



VIP Season Ticket Holder

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Posts: 398
Date: Aug 10, 2016
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J&J,AWESOME!!!...Two of my all timers!...Thanks for posting them,Seaj!



__________________

If it weren't for Honey,I'd never have come back to the hobby...Thanks,Anne!..God rest your soul.

Much Love,

Your husband, 

 

Jimmie 

 



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 10, 2016
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Thanks for checking in, Dawg.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Aug 11, 2016
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The Art of Baseball, Pt. 8

The last item in my Art of Baseball series of posts comes from the offices of the Treetop Tattler-Tribune, where one Cosmo P. Fishhawk is actually working.

Of course, Cosmo works (sometimes) for the titular editor of the Trib, P. Martin Shoemaker, or, simply, Shoe.

Shoe was the creation of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Jeff MacNelly.  Shoemaker was a tip of the cap to North Carolina journalist Jim Shoemaker, MacNelly's first newspaper boss.

http://www.shoecomics.com/about_jeff_macnelly.php

http://www.shoecomics.com/macnelly-editorials.php

http://www.shoecomics.com/about-shoe-the-comic-strip.php

http://www.shoecomics.com/about_shoe.php

Cosmo is the paper's main (only?) reporter.

In addition to MacNelly's three Pulitzer Prizes for Editorial Cartooning, he also collected two Reuben Awards, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Cartoonists Society.  He died of brain cancer in 2000.  Shoe continues to this day, however, guided by his wife, Susie, and Chris Cassatt, with Greg Brookins applying the brushwork.   

I actually have two of MacNelly's original Sunday pages, which I found in an art gallery on Norfolk, VA when I was stationed there in the mid-'80's.  Only one is sports themed, though.  Here it is: 

20160807_195807 (2).jpg



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: Aug 12, 2016
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Letters....We get letters....

Since I don't have any more artwork to show (for now...), I'm going to go back to the mailbag, and post a few more pieces of correspondence I've picked up over the past couple of years.

A few pages back, I posted a letter from a company called Jimbo's Jumbos to George Trautman, the president of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues.  The company was reporting several Minor League clubs that had failed to pay their peanut tabs for the previous season.

Evidently, this is not an unusual thing, for the league president to have to deal with various teams' unpaid bills.  Here's another one, from Lowell & Campbell Athletic Goods.  In fact, this one is a follow-up, after the company had been led to believe everything was being handled.

Oops...:

20160807_201634 (2).jpg



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__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 13, 2016
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Letters...we get letters... 

Oh, the messes that the office of the President, National Association of Professional Baseball Clubs has had to deal with over the years...

This one goes back to 1951, and involves a player named Robert Swanson, who had been purchased from the Austin Pioneers of the Big State League by the Memphis Chickasaws of the Southern Association.

Unbeknownst to the Memphis club, however, Swanson had left the country to play elsewhere.  Making matters worse, he told the Chickasaws that he would not be able to return without being extended a $500 loan.

Read on:

20160807_201426 (2).jpg



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__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Posts: 16142
Date: Aug 15, 2016
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Letters...we get letters... 

The sad end of a lifelong career.

Mickey O'Neil was a catcher in the Major Leagues for nine years, between 1919-'27, mostly with the Boston Braves.  He was a solid receiver who still ranks fifth on the all-time list for career percentage of runners caught stealing, 53.1%.

After his playing days ended, he became a coach and, later, a scout.  He managed in the Minor Leagues for a number of different organizations between 1940 and 1955.  He was the president and general manager of the Hot Springs Bathers in the Cotton States League in 1954, also taking over the managerial reins from Joe Lutz on Aug. 2.

They finished in fourth place and were eliminated in the first round of their league playoffs.

After that, however, something happened that landed O'Neil in trouble with the president of the National Association.  I picked up this letter from President George Trautman, which effectively ended O'Neil's 38-year association with Organized Baseball, on eBay:

20160807_201522 (2).jpg

I can find no information on the matter that caused his banishment.  Evidently, something happened, and O'Neil never responded to the NAPBBL office.  But there are no magical google links that I can find.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16142
Date: January 1st
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seajaw wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

Seajaw,

What do you do with this stuff? Do you have it on display in your Strat basement?


I am slowly getting some of my stuff framed for display.

I have a few items on the wall already.  For one section of wall space, I am currently working on getting a number of pieces framed.  I'll measure out the spacing and get them hung as soon as the various items are finished.  That won't be for another few months, however.

The cost of professional framing limits what I can get done.  On my budget, it's a slow process.  Sometimes, it comes down to bidding on items I want to add to the collection, versus spending the money to get another item framed.

The smaller items, such as scorecards and programs, are in plastic sheets with backing boards, and stored in binders.  I currently have eight binders, with each one representing a category of collectables (programs/scorecards, team-issued newsletters, correspondence, minor leagues, etc.).

And there is a lot of stuff that is too large/bulky to be stored in binders, such as the Heilbroner Baseball Blue Books and Year & Note Books (I'll post pics of those items in the near future).

You can also see some of the items I have, in the photo headers of my more recent replays.


Update:

The Phil Bissell Jackie Robinson piece, the MacNelly Shoe Sunday strip, and the Buffalo Evening News front page printing proof are now framed and hanging on the wall in my rec room.  I have two long wall spaces and one is now filled.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."

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