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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: Mar 31, 2015
RE: The Classic TV Zone
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The show originated in Minneapolis.  Not very far at all from the cheese you refer to.



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Third Base Coach

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Got a little distracted this past weekend as Binge TV was playing 24 hours of Dark Shadows.  Barnabas Collins was once again causing an uproar in Collinswood.



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



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Date: May 19, 2015
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Tall Tactician wrote:

Got a little distracted this past weekend as Binge TV was playing 24 hours of Dark Shadows.  Barnabas Collins was once again causing an uproar in Collinswood.


I've never heard of Binge TV.  Tell me more.  



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: May 19, 2015
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Good suggestion. I need a series to watch now that Wolf Hall is done (and the verdict on Wayward Pines is still out). I ordered Collection 1 - the one that introduces Barnabas Collins - from the local library. I saw some episodes when I was a kid, but I think the beginning of football season (lord knows why I was on the team in junior high) ended it all.



-- Edited by boomer on Wednesday 20th of May 2015 10:48:15 AM

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No spoilers, please.  My wife and I DVR'd Wayward Pines to watch this weekend.

Twenty-four hours of Dark Shadows sounds like great fun.  I used to watch it every afternoon when I was growing up.

The guy who played the groundskeeper, Willie, went on to play Harvey Lacey on Cagny & Lacey.



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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No spoilers. Just wondering if it will grab my interest, like Wolf Hall eventually did (we almost gave up on it), and Life on Mars and Battlestar Gallactica and The Americans and Lilyhammer (and I could continue) decidedly did not.



-- Edited by boomer on Wednesday 20th of May 2015 10:49:41 AM

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Date: May 19, 2015
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Anybody here seen "Allo, Allo"?

It was a Brit-com that was made back in the 80s and early 90s. It is set during WW2 in occupied France and follows a cafe owner and his dealings with the occupying Germans, the French Resistance, and two British pilots he reluctantly hides away in his cafe. The hair-brained schemes cooked up by both sides(that almost always fail) and the how the characters deal with and get out of uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous situations is hilarious.

One of our PBS stations has a sub-station that shows nothing but British TV shows and I have been watching it there, but I'll have to spring for the DVD set since the TV station seems to be skipping episodes and big chunks of entire seasons.



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boomer wrote:

No spoilers. Just wondering if it will grab my interest, like Wolf Hall eventually did (we almost gave up on it), and Life on Mars and Battlestar Gallactica and The Americans and Lilyhammer (and I could continue) decidedly did not.

Apologies to those who DVRed Wolf Hall and had no idea that Ms. Boleyn would eventually have her head "smitten", as they put it.


We ain't history major either. 

I love Damian Lewis' acting (King Henry).  He seems to capture the crazy eccentric behaviors of the character and present them as if they are normal.  (He played an off beat detective in another series called Life which you might enjoy.)  I liked the Boleyn character in the series.  Her scenes with Cromwell were often intense, chess matches of wit.

Season 1 of Dark Shadows is great, but these are really simple story lines by today's standards as are the technical standards (you'll see the occasional shadow of a microphone).  Remember the show was a low budget, mid 1960s to early 1970s program.  The black and white and eerie organ playing and introductions to the show by Victoria Winters adds to the ambiance of the series.  The shows are short and to some extent predictable.  As much as tv shows were in the 60s, it is a bit campy.  The series starts slowly and Barnabas Collins does not appear until the fifth or sixth episode.  I am drawing this out because Wolf Hall is well acted with sophisticated story lines with extravagant costuming with HD technology and based on historical events.  They are different and yet entertaining in my opinion.  But I cannot say that because you enjoy Wolf Hall, you will enjoy Dark Shadows.  But I hope you do.

 

 



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



VP of Operations

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Date: May 19, 2015
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Tall Tactician wrote:
boomer wrote:

No spoilers. Just wondering if it will grab my interest, like Wolf Hall eventually did (we almost gave up on it), and Life on Mars and Battlestar Gallactica and The Americans and Lilyhammer (and I could continue) decidedly did not.

Apologies to those who DVRed Wolf Hall and had no idea that Ms. Boleyn would eventually have her head "smitten", as they put it.


We ain't history major either. 

I love Damian Lewis' acting (King Henry).  He seems to capture the crazy eccentric behaviors of the character and present them as if they are normal.  (He played an off beat detective in another series called Life which you might enjoy.)  I liked the Boleyn character in the series.  Her scenes with Cromwell were often intense, chess matches of wit.

Season 1 of Dark Shadows is great, but these are really simple story lines by today's standards as are the technical standards (you'll see the occasional shadow of a microphone).  Remember the show was a low budget, mid 1960s to early 1970s program.  The black and white and eerie organ playing and introductions to the show by Victoria Winters adds to the ambiance of the series.  The shows are short and to some extent predictable.  As much as tv shows were in the 60s, it is a bit campy.  The series starts slowly and Barnabas Collins does not appear until the fifth or sixth episode.  I am drawing this out because Wolf Hall is well acted with sophisticated story lines with extravagant costuming with HD technology and based on historical events.  They are different and yet entertaining in my opinion.  But I cannot say that because you enjoy Wolf Hall, you will enjoy Dark Shadows.  But I hope you do.

 

 


The whole Barnabas thing was pure luck.

The series (more a melodrama than a horror show at the time) was plodding along and, during a meeting in which they were looking for ideas, someone reportedly asked something along the lines of, "Why don't we add a vampire?"  



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Well, my tastes undoubtedly have changed. Perhaps instead of being intrigued by the storylines and characters I'll just laugh my butt off like I do every time I watch Plan 9 From Outer Space. Something to be said for that, as well.

I also remember having a thing for Daphne, though I think she might have come along later in the series, and my tastes certainly changed in that regard. (I now have no idea what I saw in Marsha on The Brady Bunch either.)

The actor who plays Henry VIII on Wolf Hall played the lead (as an American) in Band of Brothers (by now classic TV). I was surprised to find out he was British (like Hugh Laurie). I'll check out "Life".

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Date: May 19, 2015
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NatsFan wrote:

Anybody here seen "Allo, Allo"?

It was a Brit-com that was made back in the 80s and early 90s. It is set during WW2 in occupied France and follows a cafe owner and his dealings with the occupying Germans, the French Resistance, and two British pilots he reluctantly hides away in his cafe. The hair-brained schemes cooked up by both sides(that almost always fail) and the how the characters deal with and get out of uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous situations is hilarious.

One of our PBS stations has a sub-station that shows nothing but British TV shows and I have been watching it there, but I'll have to spring for the DVD set since the TV station seems to be skipping episodes and big chunks of entire seasons.


I'll take a look.  I don't know a lot about Britcoms outside of Fawlty Towers, though I did enjoy Martin Clunes' fairly recent Doc Martin and Reggie Perrin.  



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Watched the first episode of collection 1 (designated as number 210 in the series) and loved it.  I haven't laughed so hard in many weeks!  The best line was when someone said "I swear on the Bible" and the retort was "the Bible you could swear on hasn't been written yet".  Great stuff.  Also loved it when one of the actors glanced a few times off-stage as if to say "did someone say cut? how much longer do I have to hammer at these chains already!"

barnabas-collins-scary.jpg

"Pull my finger . . ."



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boomer wrote:

Watched the first episode of collection 1 (designated as number 210 in the series) and loved it.  I haven't laughed so hard in many weeks!  The best line was when someone said "I swear on the Bible" and the retort was "the Bible you could swear on hasn't been written yet".  Great stuff.  Also loved it when one of the actors glanced a few times off-stage as if to say "did someone say cut? how much longer do I have to hammer at these chains already!"

barnabas-collins-scary.jpg

"Pull my finger . . ."


While not actually technically live, Dark Shadows was evidently filmed "live to tape," in that it was shot in one take.  If someone flubbed a line...too bad.

Live TV carries a huge risk, of course, with no chance to go back and fix stuff.

There was a sitcom called Roc (1991-'94), starring Charles S. Dutton.  He worked for the city, trying to provide for his family in Baltimore.  The series began to take on many of the social problems of the time, such as drug abuse.

It was a unique and exciting moment in television, when they decided to do an entire season live (real live, not tape to live) and I thought they pulled it off beautifully.

The funny thing is, no one talks like they do in any program or movie that is taped and edited.  People stumble, they lose their train of thought.  They talk over each other.  Live TV can actually come off sounding more natural, even when someone stumbles.  The true magic is not losing it, and being able to continue on, like any live theater production.



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Some of the scenes are so drawn out, you almost can see the stage manager giving the actor(s) the ol' stretch-it-out sign with an indication they still have five minutes to fill.

For the genre and era, it probably had good production values.

Hey, when I was 10, it would have scared the bejesus out of me. But then again, so did Godzilla movies and "the Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (with Don Knotts).

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boomer wrote:

Some of the scenes are so drawn out, you almost can see the stage manager giving the actor(s) the ol' stretch-it-out sign with an indication they still have five minutes to fill.

For the genre and era, it probably had good production values.

Hey, when I was 10, it would have scared the bejesus out of me. But then again, so did Godzilla movies and "the Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (with Don Knotts).


I used to race home from school every day, so I didn't miss it. 



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