SOMers - Stratomatic Baseball

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: CTB Season #1: 1911 NL Replay
« First  <  Page 91  sorted by


General Manager

Status: Offline
Posts: 13478
Date: May 15th
RE: CTB Season #1: 1911 NL Replay
Permalink  
 


Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 3786
Date: May 15th
Permalink  
 

nacster wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard


 I also voted for Marquard. I usually don't like voting a pitcher as MVP, but in 1911 things were a lot different



__________________


First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2607
Date: May 15th
Permalink  
 

chip71bucs wrote:
nacster wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard


 I also voted for Marquard. I usually don't like voting a pitcher as MVP, but in 1911 things were a lot different


 Was he your number 1 pick ?



__________________

Never Let The Fear of Striking Out Get In Your Way



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2654
Date: May 15th
Permalink  
 

Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I'll say.  I'm not surprised Schulte won the award, but it was interesting that he won with only 1 first place vote.  In additions to the 1st place vote, he had 4 2nd place votes, 3 3rd place votes, and 1 5th place vote.

I do say you can make a strong case for him and I can see why 8 out of 9 had him 3rd or higher.  

Konetchy was similar, he had only 1 1st place vote, 1 2nd place vote, 3 3rd place votes, 3 4th place votes, and 1 6th place vote.

Merkle had the 3 1st place votes, 2 2nd place votes, 1 3rd place vote, 1 4th place vote, 1 5th place vote, and he was left off of a ballot.

Marquard had the remaining 4 1st place votes, 1 6th place vote, and was left off of 4 ballots.

I think all had a case, plus Alexander.  Marquard had the most dominating season, but I know there is a philosophy that position players are more important than pitchers.  

 



__________________

"The players are the same age always, but the man in the crowd is older every season."

 



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2654
Date: May 15th
Permalink  
 

chip71bucs wrote:
nacster wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard


 I also voted for Marquard. I usually don't like voting a pitcher as MVP, but in 1911 things were a lot different


I'll say, often your ace was your closer as well.  I didn't use Marquard that way, but in real life he did appear in several games as a relief pitcher.  In my 1911 AL replay I use starters as relief pitcher much more often (e.g. Big Ed Walsh). 



__________________

"The players are the same age always, but the man in the crowd is older every season."

 



General Manager

Status: Offline
Posts: 13478
Date: May 15th
Permalink  
 

Definitely there is that "starting pitchers have their own award" bias still here at SOMers.

No way I could not make Marquard the top guy in "MVP" voting. Pitcher's Triple Crown. Undefeated season; 13 starts and 12 wins (did they win the game he got a no decision in?). Third (basically, Crandall was so close to qualifying) in WHIP, and only because Babe Adams was famously stingy with allowing walks; he was the hardest pitcher to hit in the league. Un...de...feated....



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16147
Date: May 16th
Permalink  
 

chip71bucs wrote:
nacster wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard


 I also voted for Marquard. I usually don't like voting a pitcher as MVP, but in 1911 things were a lot different


Same here.  I also gave Rube my #1 vote. 



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 3786
Date: May 16th
Permalink  
 

Eaglesfly wrote:
chip71bucs wrote:
nacster wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:

The Most Important Player vote is very interesting


 I can say I was one of the four tha voted for Marquard


 I also voted for Marquard. I usually don't like voting a pitcher as MVP, but in 1911 things were a lot different


 Was he your number 1 pick ?


 Yep



__________________


First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2654
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

Thank you all for following along. Some of you have asked where I've found the information I used in creating this replay. I created a bibliography to show you the books I read before and during the replay.

Alexander, Charles. John McGraw. University of Nebraska Press. 1988

  • Tells the story of the manager that defined the Dead Ball Era.  Alexander has written several baseball books, all are very good.


Halfon, Mark S. Tales from the Deadball Era: Ty Cobb, Home Run Baker, Shoeless Joe Jackson, and the Wildest Times in Baseball History. Potomac Press. 2014

  • I was a bit disappointed by this book, but it did contain some good information on the style of play and rowdyism of the Dead Ball Era


James, Bill. The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Free Press. 2001

  • Good overall view of baseball with chapters on the various decades in baseball history.  Interesting read.


Klein, Maury. Stealing Games. Bloomsbury Press. 2016

  • I had completed my replay when I read this book.  Chronicled the 1911 season with a focus on McGraw's Giants.  


Ritter, Lawrence S. The Glory of Their Time: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It. Harperperennial Modern Classics. 1966

  • A must read for any baseball fan.  I also recommend the audio version where you can hear the actual interview and voices of these ballplayers from 100 years ago.


Schechter, Gabriel. Victory Faust: The Rube Who Saved McGraw’s Giants. Charles April Publications. 2000

  • Tells the highly interesting story of Victory Faust and the 1911 Giants.  A real fun read.


Simon, Tom, Editor. Deadball Stars of the National League. Brassey’s Inc. 2004

  • Collection of the SABR biographies you can find on Baseball Reference.  A great source for the biographies I included in my 1911 replay.


Skipper, John C. Wicked Curve: The Life and Troubled Times of Grover Cleveland Alexander. McFarland & Co., Inc. 2006

  • Alexander is only a rookie in 1911, but I find him to be a fascinating player and really wanted to learn more about Ol' Pete.  This is a well done biography on the ups and downs of one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history.

These books along with on-line research of various sites - many of which I've forgotten - allowed me to learn much more about 1911 and the Dead Ball Era of baseball.



__________________

"The players are the same age always, but the man in the crowd is older every season."

 



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2654
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

I'll start posting my 1911 American League replay on Sunday, July 9.

__________________

"The players are the same age always, but the man in the crowd is older every season."

 



First Base Coach

Status: Offline
Posts: 2607
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

glewis wrote:

I'll start posting my 1911 American League replay on Sunday, July 9.


 Looking forward to it -



__________________

Never Let The Fear of Striking Out Get In Your Way



Manager

Status: Offline
Posts: 9757
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

Eaglesfly wrote:
glewis wrote:

I'll start posting my 1911 American League replay on Sunday, July 9.


 Looking forward to it -


 Awesome!!



__________________

I wanted to play more SOM so I retired.

 



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16147
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

stratfan70 wrote:
Eaglesfly wrote:
glewis wrote:

I'll start posting my 1911 American League replay on Sunday, July 9.


 Looking forward to it -


 Awesome!!


Agreed.  Looking forward to it.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16147
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

glewis wrote:

Thank you all for following along. Some of you have asked where I've found the information I used in creating this replay. I created a bibliography to show you the books I read before and during the replay.

Alexander, Charles. John McGraw. University of Nebraska Press. 1988

  • Tells the story of the manager that defined the Dead Ball Era.  Alexander has written several baseball books, all are very good.


Halfon, Mark S. Tales from the Deadball Era: Ty Cobb, Home Run Baker, Shoeless Joe Jackson, and the Wildest Times in Baseball History. Potomac Press. 2014

  • I was a bit disappointed by this book, but it did contain some good information on the style of play and rowdyism of the Dead Ball Era


James, Bill. The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Free Press. 2001

  • Good overall view of baseball with chapters on the various decades in baseball history.  Interesting read.


Klein, Maury. Stealing Games. Bloomsbury Press. 2016

  • I had completed my replay when I read this book.  Chronicled the 1911 season with a focus on McGraw's Giants.  


Ritter, Lawrence S. The Glory of Their Time: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It. Harperperennial Modern Classics. 1966

  • A must read for any baseball fan.  I also recommend the audio version where you can hear the actual interview and voices of these ballplayers from 100 years ago.


Schechter, Gabriel. Victory Faust: The Rube Who Saved McGraw’s Giants. Charles April Publications. 2000

  • Tells the highly interesting story of Victory Faust and the 1911 Giants.  A real fun read.


Simon, Tom, Editor. Deadball Stars of the National League. Brassey’s Inc. 2004

  • Collection of the SABR biographies you can find on Baseball Reference.  A great source for the biographies I included in my 1911 replay.


Skipper, John C. Wicked Curve: The Life and Troubled Times of Grover Cleveland Alexander. McFarland & Co., Inc. 2006

  • Alexander is only a rookie in 1911, but I find him to be a fascinating player and really wanted to learn more about Ol' Pete.  This is a well done biography on the ups and downs of one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history.

These books along with on-line research of various sites - many of which I've forgotten - allowed me to learn much more about 1911 and the Dead Ball Era of baseball.


Excellent selections.

Some, I've read.  A couple I am unfamiliar with.  I have the Faust book, but got it too far along in the replay to take the time to read it. 



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Lower Deck - Infield Ticket

Status: Offline
Posts: 85
Date: 5 days ago
Permalink  
 

I have been playing strat for 35 years and I have to say that I am amazed with the research and presentation that ALL of you put into your projects on somers. I am so glad I stumbled upon this site. I read this entire replay today and learned so much about the 1911 season. Thanks for the replay, looking forward to the American League!

__________________
« First  <  Page 91  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard