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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Ohio State Historical Match-Ups
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For a couple years now, I have been playing the various historical Ohio State teams that I have created against each other and the other teams in Strat-O-Matic’s “great teams” set.  These Ohio State teams have been cobbled together using players from the various Strat-O-Matic college seasons I own, with card adjustments (as appropriate).  I primarily use the computer game, though there is a manual C&D element that is necessary to implement my fairly limited card alterations.  I’ve done quite a bit of research to assemble these teams, which now number 19 (20 after I add the 2014 Buckeyes).

I have posted results of my various seasons (or “challenges”, as I call them) - at Strat-O-Matic.net.  I am currently on my fourth challenge, which includes the 1999-2005 great teams.  (I also play a series in November between the 1973 Buckeyes and Wolverines to commemorate their controversial 10-10 battle that year.  I played a five-game series in 2013 and a three-game series in 2014.  Fittingly, the series is tied at 4-4.)  If I undertake a fifth challenge, which likely would feature only Ohio State teams (though there is a possibility I will add four Michigan teams into the mix), I was thinking of posting the results at this site for my (and hopefully others’) amusement.

For starters, I thought I would at least introduce the teams here with a series of pre-season match-ups.  I will start with the two oldest teams – the 1935 Buckeyes, which I just finished creating, and the 1917 Buckeyes, which I created for my most-recent challenge.  I will work my way to the present (or at least the immediate past) with the 2013 Buckeyes taking on the 2014 Buckeyes.



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Background for Game One

Both OSU 17 and OSU 35 are based on lots of research, but very little stats (which weren’t collected in any useful form – for Ohio State, at least – until the 1942 season). Since all of my teams have to play each other, as well as the “great teams” from 1966-2005, they essentially play the modern game. You won’t see anyone punting on first down, that’s for sure! Nevertheless, I have tried to retain the teams’ essential characters (offensive focus, strengths and weaknesses, etc.).

In the real world, coach John Wilce’s 1917 Buckeyes finished with an 8-0-1 record (4-0-0 in conference play), outscoring their opponents 292-6. The team featured perhaps the first great Buckeye football player, All-American Chic Harley, who excelled in every aspect of the game. Though a running back, Harley was the team’s primary passer. (Before 1950, quarterbacks often were mere play-callers and blockers, running the occasional “sneak”.) Harley, halfback Pete Stinchcomb, fullback Dick Boesel and quarterback Howard Yerges constituted what many think was one of the greatest backfields in Buckeye history. Their solid defensive and offensive lines were anchored by All-American ends Charles “Shifty” Bolen and Harold “Hap” Courtney and All-American center Kelley Van Dyne (not to mention guard Bob “Jumbo” Karch, who was a behemoth in his day at 225 pounds).

In Round I of my current OSU Challenge, OSU 17 impressively outscored their opponents 74-55, but barely missed the cut for Round II with a 2-3-0 record. They were a mere handful of points away from going undefeated, losing to the 1968 Buckeyes 15-14, the 1961 Buckeyes 7-6 and the 1957 Buckeyes 17-14 (all coached by Woody Hayes).

gallery6_large.jpg
Pete Stinchcomb (L) and Chic Harley (R) take
timeout during practice to pose for the camera.
I doubt a picture of Stinchcomb without mud on
his face ever existed.

Coach Francis Schmidt’s 1935 Buckeyes were 7-1-0 overall (5-0-0 in conference play) in real life, losing only to Notre Dame 18-13 in the so-called “Game of the Century”. They outscored their opponents 237-57 and shut-out Michigan 38-0.

At the helm were quarterbacks Frank Pincura – considered the best passer in the conference, but often sidelined with injuries – and William Henry Harrison Dye (aka “Tippy”). The diminutive Dye was a less-effective passer, relying mostly on short and shovel passes, but was a much more elusive runner. As a return man, he returned two punts for touchdowns in 1935.

Dick “Bull” Heekin, Frank Boucher and breakaway artist “Jumpin’ Joe” Williams provided an excellent rushing attack for the 1935 Buckeyes, while All-American end Merle Wendt was the team’s pass receiving stand-out. Every OSU 1935 lineman either was an All-American or was at one time considered to be in the running for such honors. But it was All-American middle linebacker/guard (and offensive center) Gomer Jones who was the unstoppable monster in the middle on defense. Check out the fuzzy Notre Dame game film on Youtube and you will think you are watching Dick Butkus in action.


1002-tippy-dye-vs-notre-dame.jpg
Tippy Dye, off to the races against Notre Dame
in “The Game of the Century”.

Having just been assembled, OSU 1935 has yet to play a game in the strat-o-sphere. Their preseason match-up against OSU 1917 certainly will be interesting, but I give the edge to Chic Harley & Company. Sorry, Gomer.



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OSU’35 Prevails Over OSU'17 in Tight Contest, 23-21
Hamrick Tackles Boesel for Safety for Win

In their first ever Strat-O-Matic contest, the 1935 Buckeyes came out on top with a solid ground game, ball control and timely interceptions.

For the 1917 Buckeyes, Chic Harley had nine points and led all rushers with 102 yards.  But Harley was picked four times, including once in the endzone with seconds remaining in the first half.  Harley fumbled the ball as well, but teammate Chief Peabody scooped it up and raced 39 yards for an OSU’17 score.  Peabody also had two receptions for 19 yards and 10 tackles.  Fellow end and linebacker Shifty Bolen had a reception, eight tackles and two defensive fumble recoveries.

For OSU’35, Frank Boucher rushed for 97 yards on 15 carries with one touchdown, and Jumpin’ Joe Williams added 69 yards and two touchdowns on only 9 carries.  Quarterback Tippy Dye had a fine game that included an almost flawlessly engineered 86-yard touchdown drive late in the second quarter, which was topped off by a four-yard plunge by Frank Boucher.  Strong safety Frank Antennuci had two of the team’s four interceptions.

Next up, Paul Brown’s 1942 Buckeyes take on Woody Hayes’ 1954 Buckeyes.  Both teams were Associated Press national champions.

 

 

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

Total

Ohio State 1917

0

14

0

7

21

Ohio State 1935

6

7

8

2

23

 

 

Scoring Plays

 

Qtr

Clock

Poss

Description (Extra Point)

Score

  

1

9:21

Ohio State 1935

J.Williams 16 yard run (kick blocked)

6-0 O35

  

2

14:07

Ohio State 1917

D.Boesel 10 yard run (C.Harley kick)

7-6 O17

  

2

6:54

Ohio State 1935

F.Boucher 4 yard run (S.Busich kick)

13-7 O35

  

2

4:58

Ohio State 1917

C.Peabody 39 yard fumble recovery (C.Harley kick)

14-13 O17

  

3

1:38

Ohio State 1935

J.Williams 13 yard run (T.Dye Run)

21-14 O35

  

4

9:19

Ohio State 1917

C.Harley 5 yard run (C.Harley kick)

21-21 tie

  

4

5:25

Ohio State 1935

Safety – C.Hamrick tackles D.Boesel in end zone

23-21 O35

  


-- Edited by boomer on Monday 30th of March 2015 07:35:21 PM

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Team Statistics

 

Ohio State 1917

Ohio State 1935

First Downs by Rush-Pass-Pen-Total

11-5-1-17

18-3-0-21

Total Offense-Plays-Avg Yards Per Play

278-58-4.8

306-66-4.6

Total Net Yards Rushing

211

249

Average Per Rush

4.8

4.6

Passes Completed/Attempted

5/14 (35.7%)

6/12 (50.0%)

Net Yards Passing

67

57

Punts/Average

4/36.3

4/41.0

Interceptions/Returns

1/13

4/62

Penalties/Yards

4/18

4/27

Total Fumbles/Fumbles Lost

2/0

3/2

Time of Possession

27 mins 22 secs

32 mins 38 secs

 

Passing Stats

 

Att

Comp

Yds

Comp %

Yds/Att

TD

TD %

INT

INT %

Long

Sack

Rating

Ohio State 1917

Chic Harley

14

5

67

35.7

4.8

0

0

4

28.6

27

0/0

18.8

Ohio State 1935

Stan Pincura

6

2

16

33.3

2.7

0

0

1

16.7

15

0/0

22.4

Tippy Dye

6

4

41

66.7

6.8

0

0

0

0

16

0/0

124.1

 

 



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Rushing Stats

 

No

Yds

Avg

Long

TD

2 Pt Conv

Fumbles/Lost

Ohio State 1917

Chic Harley

16

102

6.4

14

1

0

1/0

Pete Stinchcomb

12

42

3.5

12

0

0

0/0

Dick Boesel

10

32

3.2

12

1

0

0/0

Howard Yerges

2

3

1.5

4

0

0

0/0

Frank Willaman

2

1

0.5

3

0

0

0/0

Fritz Schweitzer

2

31

15.5

33

0

0

1/0

Ohio State 1935

Dick Heekin

17

48

2.8

13

0

0

1/1

Frank Boucher

15

97

6.5

31

1

0

0/0

Joe Williams

9

69

7.7

16

2

0

2/1

Frank Antennuci

5

7

1.4

7

0

0

0/0

John Bettridge

4

22

5.5

12

0

0

0/0

Jim McDonald

3

7

2.3

3

0

0

0/0

Stan Pincura

1

-1

-1.0

-1

0

0

0/0



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Receiving Stats

 

No

Yds

Avg

Long

TD

2 Pt Conv

Ohio State 1917

Hap Courtney

2

37

18.5

27

0

0

Chief Peabody

2

19

9.5

11

0

0

Shifty Bolen

1

11

11.0

11

0

0

Ohio State 1935

Dick Heekin

2

20

10.0

16

0

0

Merle Wendt

2

27

13.5

15

0

0

Frank Boucher

1

9

9.0

9

0

0

Frank Antennuci

1

1

1.0

1

0

0

Trevor Rees

0

0

0.0

0

0

1



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This is cool stuff.  I'm learning a lot here.



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Thanks for checking out the thread. This (extended) project encompasses my enjoyment of college football (especially Ohio State football) and history in general. The mathematical aspect of creating cards is interesting from a theoretical standpoint, but a pain when it comes to the nuts and bolts (addition, division, etc.), which I have to do manually. I wish I had computer programs to do the work for me and an ability to create computer cards (like SOM).

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Background for Game Two – OSU 1942 vs OSU 1954

34 year-old Paul Brown’s 1942 Ohio State Buckeyes were 9-1-0 overall and 5-1-0 in conference play, outscoring their opponents by an average of 34-11.  Their only loss was to Wisconsin in the so-called “Bad Water Game” where more than half of the OSU players contracted dysentery after drinking contaminated water on the train to Madison.  Nevertheless, the Buckeyes won the Big Ten Conference (then called the Western Conference) after the Badgers (8-1-1) were upset by Iowa the following week.  Ohio State also was voted national champions by the Associated Press after defeating Bernie Bierman’s talented Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawks – a World War II military school that featured many college and professional all-stars – 41-12.

OSU 1942 had a solid defense and a big-play offense.  Similar to Urban Meyer 70 years later, Brown emphasized speed, conditioning and fundamentals.  The team averaged over 20 yards per completion – a mark that I doubt any other Ohio State team has come close to since – and 5.0 yards per run.  Despite needing contact lenses to play, tailback Paul Sarringhaus was the team’s top passer with 20 completions in 41 attempts for 517 yards.  With 618 rushing yards (5.3 avg), he was second-best on the team to fullback Gene Fekete, the Western Conference rushing champion, who collected 910 yards (4.9 avg).  Wingback  Les Horvath, who would win the Heisman Trophy in 1944, rushed for 481 yards (4.8 avg) and was 11 of 18 through the air.  All-American end Bob Shaw was an offensive and defensive stand-out.  He caught 17 passes for a remarkable 474 yards (27.9 avg).  Future NFL stand-outs included NFL Hall of Fame end Dante Lavelli, who was injured for most of the year, NFL and College Hall of Fame tackle Bill Willis, and All-American guard Lin Houston.  Though he only played freshman ball that year, I took the liberty of adding NFL great Lou Groza to the team.  All four, by the way, also played for Paul Brown in the NFL.

paulbrown.jpg
Coach Paul Brown discusses strategy with fullback
Gene Fekete (far left)
and tailback Paul Sarringhaus
while Bill Willis (far right) and his teammates look on.

In my current challenge, OSU 1942 was 3-2-0 in Round I, which qualified them for Round II.  After six weeks in Round II play, they are 2-3-0 (third place in their division, a game and a half behind division leader OSU 1979).

The 1954 Buckeyes were Woody Hayes’ first great team.  They were a perfect 10-0-0, including a 20-7 win in the Rose Bowl against USC.  They outscored their opponents 249-75 and were not a difficult choice for national champions.  Their star player was All-American back Howard “Hopalong” Cassady, an offensive and defensive stand-out who would win the Heisman Trophy in 1955.

Though not as explosive as Brown’s 1942 squad, Hayes’ Buckeyes had an excellent ground game (consistently one of the best in my challenges).  Their starting running backs – Cassady, halfback Bobby Watkins, and fullback Hubert Bobo – averaged 6.0, 5.7 and 6.1 yards per carry, respectively.  Quarterback Dave Leggett hit on 48.8% of his passes – pretty good for his day – and added 235 rushing yards.  The 1954 Buckeyes’ formidable line was anchored by All-Americans Jim Reichenbach (G) and Dean Dugger (E) and eventual two-time All-American and Outland Trophy winner Jim Parker.

quartet-2.jpg
The 1954 Buckeye backfield – left to right:  quarterback
Dave Leggett, halfback Bobby Watkins, fullback Hubert
Bobo and halfback Hop Cassady

Despite their rushing and defensive prowess, the 1954 Buckeyes have not fared well in my challenges.  They had the worst record in my third challenge (2-11-0) and finished 2-4-0 in my last challenge, where they failed to make Round II but finished well by defeating the 1957 Buckeyes 17-10 and the 1995 Buckeyes 29-17.

The 1942 Buckeyes should defeat the 1954 Buckeyes, but Woody has a way of circling the wagons when you least expect him to.



-- Edited by boomer on Wednesday 1st of April 2015 05:18:15 PM

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Manager

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Impressive work you're putting into this project boomer.

Enjoyable to follow along even if one isn't a big Buckeye fan.

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Thanks, though some might say "obsessive".

Brown’s 1942 Buckeyes Top Hayes’ 1954 Buckeyes 33-14
Groza Scores 15 Points, Fekete Rushes for 154

After it appeared as though the 1942 Buckeyes would run away with this one, Woody and his 1954 squad pulled within six in the third.  But Paul Brown & Company turned the jets back on and pulled away by 19 by the final gun. 

It was OSU 42’s fullback Gene Fekete that put the game on ice in the fourth with a 75-yard touchdown run.  He led all rushers with 154 yards, which equaled the total for the entire OSU 54 team.  Lou Groza also had an outstanding day, scoring 15 points and hitting on all four of his field goal attempts.

For the 1954 Buckeyes, Hop Cassady had an uncharacteristically poor outing.  He rushed for only 36 yards on 15 carries and had no receptions.  Typically, OSU 54 does well when quarterback Dave Leggett does well.  Though Leggett led the team on consecutive scoring drives in the third, which included a 39-yard run by the wily quarterback, he was only 4 of 13 for 66 yards through the air.

Next up, it’s all Woody ball, as Hayes’ run-heavy 1957 Buckeyes take on his 1961 team, which features a three-headed quarterback attack.

 

 

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

Total

 Ohio State 1942

3

17

0

13

33

 Ohio State 1954

0

0

14

0

14

SCORING PLAYS

QTR

TEAM

DESCRIPTION

1

OSU 42

Groza 32 yard field goal

2

OSU 42

Sarringhaus 19 yard run (Groza kick)

2

OSU 42

Sarringhaus 6 yard run (Groza kick)

2

OSU 42

Groza 37 yard field goal

3

OSU 54

Leggett 4 yard run (Weed kick)

3

OSU 54

Watkins 12 yard run (Weed kick)

4

OSU 42

Groza 29 yard field goal

4

OSU 42

Fekete 75 yard run (Groza kick)

4

OSU 42

Groza 39 yard field goal



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RUSHING

Ohio State 1942

No

Yds

Avg

Long

TD

2 Pt

Fum

Gene Fekete

14

154

11.0

75

1

0

0/0

Paul Sarringhaus

12

61

5.1

19

2

0

0/0

Les Horvath

9

38

5.6

30

0

0

0/0

Bob Frye

3

12

4.0

7

0

0

0/0

Dick Palmer

2

10

5.0

9

0

0

0/0

Tommy James

2

5

2.5

3

0

0

0/0

George Lynn

1

3

3.0

3

0

0

0/0

George Slusser

1

4

4.0

4

0

0

0/0



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Ohio State 1954

No

Yds

Avg

Long

TD

2 Pt

Fum

Howard Cassady

15

36

2.4

12

0

0

0/0

Bobby Watkins

12

54

4.5

12

1

0

0/0

Dave Leggett

10

42

4.2

39

1

0

0/0

Hubert Bobo

6

27

4.5

16

0

0

0/0

Jerry Harkrader

3

-5

-1.7

2

0

0

0/0



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I give up.  I wanted to post more stats, but this site is way too restrictive on post length to do so.  It won't even accept a table of both team's rushing statistics (see last two posts).



-- Edited by boomer on Thursday 2nd of April 2015 10:05:04 PM

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Background for Game Three – OSU 1957 vs OSU 1961

The 1957 Buckeyes were one of the most run-centric offenses the run-centric Woody Hayes ever had.  They averaged 61.6 rushes and 292.6 yards per game, but it hardly was three yards and a cloud of dust at 4.8 yards per carry.  Halfbacks Don Clark and Dick LeBeau rushed for 737 yards (5.6 average) and 360 yards (4.2 average), respectively, while fullbacks Bob White and Galen Cisco added 645 (5.7 average) and 350 (5.0 average), respectively.

The passing attack, such as it was, was led by hard-nosed quarterback Frank Kremblas.  Though Kremblas completed only 20 of 47 (42.6%) for 337 in 1957, he was intercepted only once.  One of his targets was future two-time All-American, Cleveland Brown and College Football Hall of Famer Jim Houston, who was the brother of OSU 1942’s Lin Houston.

The OSU 1957 defense, led by Houston and All-American guard Aurealius Thomas, was not one of Woody’s best.  But it nevertheless held opponents to less than 10 points per game (16th in the nation).

The 1957 Buckeyes posted a 9-1-0 record (losing only to troublesome TCU on opening day, 18-14), outscored their opponents  26.7 to 9.2, and won the Big Ten with a 7-0-0 record.  They defeated Oregon in the Rose Bowl, 10-7.

clark_kremblas_medium.jpg

Ohio State quarterback Frank Kremblas clears a
path for Don Clark in the 1958 Rose Bowl.

I like to refer to the 1961 Buckeyes as the Rodney Dangerfield of Ohio State football teams.  They were 8-0-1 – coincidentally, the only blemish on their record also coming at the hands of TCU – and won the Big Ten after clobbering Michigan 50-20.  But they got no respect from the astonishingly selfish Ohio State University faculty, who were able to and did slap Hayes and the entire football program in the face at the expense of a fine group of athletes by voting 28-25 not to send the team to the 1962 Rose Bowl.  The move crippled Hayes’ recruiting efforts for many years, and no doubt the self-promoting architect of the evil conspiracy, Jack Fullen, lost no sleep as a result.

On the bright side, the team featured one of the best fullbacks in Ohio State history, which includes many top-notch bruisers.  Bob Ferguson, who rushed for 938 yards and 11 touchdowns on 202 carries (4.6 average), failed by a mere 53 points of becoming the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy.  That honor went to that year’s winner, Ernie Davis.

Other offensive stand-outs included halfback and future NFL Hall of Fame wide receiver Paul Warfield (5.5 yards per carry and 13.3 yards per reception), and quarterback (one of three) Joe Sparma, who pitched for the Detroit Tigers for several years.  Sparma put up Sarringhaus-like numbers, averaging 21.3 yards per completion.

Like OSU 1957, OSU 1961 allowed 9.2  points per game, which also ranked 16th in the nation.  Their “no-name defense”, which was excellent against the run (3.1 yards per carry), was led by all-conference linebacker Mike Ingram.

ferguson-michigan.jpg.pagespeed.ce.JEPdLGyK4o.jpg  bilde?Site=BE&Date=20131021&Category=SPORTS&ArtNo=310210010&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&Legacy-Warfield-poetry-motion

The original “thunder and lightning” – Ferguson (L)
and Warfield (R) help demolish Michigan.

This game is tough to predict.  Both teams finished 3-2-0 in Round I of my current challenge, with OSU 1961 easily defeating OSU 1957 in their only match-up, 21-3.  However, OSU 1957 recovered from the loss and made it to Round II.  OSU 1961 failed to advance when they lost their wild card match-up to Urban Meyer and his 2013 Buckeyes 17-16 (thanks to a fumble on the OSU 2013 six yard-line with 30 seconds left).



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