SOMers - Stratomatic Baseball

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Career Slugging Percentage of 3.000
Page 1 of 1  sorted by


Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 806
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Career Slugging Percentage of 3.000
Permalink  
 


It's been quite some time since I've posted, some of the members here from the early days of this forum may recall I've always been a sabermetric minded person. Found this little nugget of trivia while researching.  Four players hold a career slugging percentage of 3.000, they tripled in their only Major League at bat. 

Eric Cammack of the 2000 Mets, Scott Munninghoff of the 80 Phillies, Eduardo Rodriguez of the 73 Brewers and Charlie Lindstromn of the 58 White Sox.
Have not researched as to why it was their only at bat...considering the obvious.



__________________

I'd wake up at night with the smell of the ball park in my nose, the cool of the grass on my feet...The Thrill of the Grass...Heck, I'd play for free!



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

scorpio rising 2 wrote:

It's been quite some time since I've posted, some of the members here from the early days of this forum may recall I've always been a sabermetric minded person. Found this little nugget of trivia while researching.  Four players hold a career slugging percentage of 3.000, they tripled in their only Major League at bat. 

Eric Cammack of the 2000 Mets, Scott Munninghoff of the 80 Phillies, Eduardo Rodriguez of the 73 Brewers and Charlie Lindstromn of the 58 White Sox.
Have not researched as to why it was their only at bat...considering the obvious.


 

Eric Wade Cammack (born August 14, 1975) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the New York Mets during the 2000 season. Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 180 lb., Cammack batted and threw right-handed. A native of Nederland, Texas, he was selected by the Mets in the 1997 draft out of the Lamar University Cardinals.

In eight relief appearances, Cammack posted a 6.30 earned run average and did not have a decision or saves, giving up seven runs on seven hits and 10 walks while striking out nine in 10.0 innings of work.

Cammack also pitched from 1997 through 2004 in the Mets, Astros and Athletics minor league systems. In 134 games, he collected a 24–15 record with a 3.17 ERA and 68 saves in 420 ⅔ innings.

As a hitter, Cammack hit a triple in his first and only plate appearance (2000), joining Charlie Lindstrom (1958), Eduardo Rodríguez (1973), and Scott Munninghoff (1980) as the only players to accomplish this feat in major league history.

==========================================================================

Scott Andrew Munninghoff (born December 5, 1958 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played briefly for the Philadelphia Phillies during the 1980 season. Listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 175 pounds (79 kg), he batted and threw right-handed.

Munninghoff was drafted by the Phillies in the first round of the 1977 Major League Baseball Draft (22 overall) out of Purcell Marian High School. His professional career started off poorly, as he went 0–5 with a 5.52 earned run average for the New York–Penn League's Auburn Phillies in 1977. However, he improved to 17–7 with a 2.30 ERA in 26 starts for the 1978 Spartanburg Phillies.[1]

He debuted with the Philadelphia Phillies on April 13, 1980, pitching two scoreless innings out of the bullpen against the Montreal Expos. On April 22, in his first and only plate appearance, Munninghoff hit a triple and scored a run against Tom Hausman of the New York Mets,[2] joining Chuck Lindstrom (1958), Eduardo Rodríguez (1973) and Eric Cammack (2000) as the only pitchers to accomplish this feat in major league history.

These players share the MLB record of a 3.000 career slugging percentage.

After a poor outing against the Los Angeles Dodgers, in which he gave up a single, wild pitch and walked two (one of which occurred with the bases loaded) Munninghoff was reassigned to the triple A Oklahoma City 89ers. In four relief appearances, Munninghoff posted a 4.50 ERA and did not have a decision or save, giving up three earned runs on eight hits and five walks while striking out two in 6.0 innings of work.

Munninghoff spent the remainder of the 1980 season and all of 1981 with Oklahoma. On December 9, 1981, he was sent to the Cleveland Indians in completion of an earlier deal made on November 20, 1981 in which the Phillies sent a player to be named later to the Indians; the Indians sent catcher Bo Díaz to the Phillies; the Phillies sent Lonnie Smith to the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cardinals sent Silvio Martinez and Lary Sorensen to the Indians. He spent one season in the Indians' organization, and pitched several seasons of independent ball before becoming a coach at Purcell Marian.

Munninghoff currently owns a roofing company in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lives with his wife and children.[3]

 

============================================================================

Eduardo Rodríguez Reyes [Volanta] (March 6, 1952 – March 6, 2009) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball from 1973 through 1979 for the Milwaukee Brewers (1973–78) and Kansas City Royals (1979), mostly as a relief pitcher. Listed at 6' 0", 185 lb., Rodríguez batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico.

In a seven-season career, Rodríguez posted a 42–36 record with a 3.89 ERA and 32 saves in 264 appearances, including 39 starts, one shutout and seven complete games, giving up 317 earned runs on 681 hits and 323 walks while striking out 430 in 734 innings of work.

Rodríguez died at his Barceloneta home of a heart attack on his 57th birthday.[1]

Facts

===========================================================================================

Charles William Lindstrom (born September 7, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is the son of Baseball Hall of Famer Freddie Lindstrom, and the holder of two all-time Major League Baseball records - though his career lasted a single game.

A catcher standing 5' 11" and weighing 175 lb, batting and throwing right-handed, he was signed by the Chicago White Sox as an amateur free agent on June 17, 1957. Fifteen months later, he was in the Major Leagues, coming into the fifth inning of a game September 28, 1958 versus the Kansas City Athletics as a defensive replacement for Johnny Romano. The first pitch from pitcher Hal Trosky was fumbled by Lindstrom as a passed ball, but he settled down and did not make another error.[1]

In his first at bat in the bottom of the sixth inning, Lindstrom led off with a walk, scoring on a double by Don Mueller. Then, in the bottom of the seventh, he tripled, driving in Johnny Callison with another run. He was on deck for a third at bat when Sammy Esposito struck out looking to end the White Sox' last offensive inning in a game they won 11-4.

This would be Lindstrom's only Major League game, as he was sent down to the minor leagues the following season, never returning to the Major League. But with a triple, a walk, a run, and a run batted in in two plate appearances, Lindstrom still holds the records (though unofficial, due to inadequate at bats over a career) for the highest slugging percentage (3.000) and OPS (4.000) in major league history over an entire career. Along with John Paciorek, he has the distinction of having had one of the best one-game careers in the history of baseball.

Lindstrom retired shortly thereafter and went on to a successful 23-year coaching career with Lincoln College, highlighted by a 29-10 record in 1972 and five successive years of 20-win seasons starting with 1972.



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

I CAN tell you that Rodriguez' triple was due to the Brewers manager swapping out players and giving up the DH, so Rodriguez (who relived Jim Slaton) had to bat.

www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/MIL/MIL197309031.shtml

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

Munninghoff played for Philly, and without checking the box score for the game, my guess is he hit a blooper that may have bounced on the turf if they played at the Vet that day, and gotten past the OF'er.

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Third Base Coach

Status: Online
Posts: 6297
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

Is there a Bob Seger connection here?  Scott Munninghoff

From The 1980 Phillies Yearbook:

·          Favorite Color:  Blue

·          Favorite Singer/Group:  Molly Hatchet. Led Zeppelin

·          Favorite Song:  Turn the Page by Bob Seger

·          Favorite City:  Cincinnati (where I can be with my family and friends)

·          Least Favorite City:  Charleston, S.C.

·          Person You'd Most Like To Meet:  Steve Martin

·          Boyhood Idol(s):  Willie Mays, Joe Namath

·          Biggest Turn-On:  Thinking about pitching at Veterans Stadium

·          Biggest Turn-Off:  People smoking while I’m eating

·          Favorite Subject in School:  Mechanical Drawing

·          Favorite TV Show:  Soap (Burt Campbell is a riot)

·          Favorite Book:  The Exorcist

·          Person You Most Admire:  My wife Colleen, a fine lady and a great mother

·          Greatest Achievement:  Being selected as the Phillies number one pick in 1977

·          Most Memorable Moment:  Watching the birth of my daughter Kelli

·          Hobbies:  Fishing, listening to music, drinking beer, golf, eating



__________________

Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16185
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

nacster wrote:

Munninghoff played for Philly, and without checking the box score for the game, my guess is he hit a blooper that may have bounced on the turf if they played at the Vet that day, and gotten past the OF'er.


All I can find is that he hit it to right field leading off the third inning of a game in which he relieved Dick Ruthven, who got lit up.

Actually, the last two runs against Ruthven in a six-run second scored on consecutive base hits allowed by Munninghoff.

As you surmised, it was at the Vet.  Following his triple of unknown trajectory, he scored on a sac fly by Pete Rose.

Who knows?  It might have also been a cue shot down the right field line that got into the corner.

I can't find anything else in any of the google listings under "scott munninghoff triple."

As it turns out, Hoff inherited a 6-2 deficit in the top of the second inning.  He pitched 3-1/3, surrendering six hits and two runs (in the fourth).

It wasn't a sterling performance, but the Phils got one in the third (his triple), and added another after he surrendered the two runs in the top of the fourth, making it 8-4.

Here's the fun part: the Phils then tallied four times in the bottom of the fifth, knotting the score at 8-8.  George Vukovich, who pinch-hit for Munninghoff, tripled (!!!), leading off the inning.  Following a walk to Rose, Vuke scored on a single to right field by Bake McBride.

Greg Luzinski capped the score a bit later with a three-run homer to tie the game.  Dallas Green handed the ball to Kevin Saucier, who tossed three scoreless.

In the bottom of the eighth, the Phils erupted for six runs.  Keith Moreland pinch-hit for Saucier as the rally started to take shape, and contributed a double that played Larry Bowa with the go-ahead run.

Later in the inning, Mike Schmidt contributed a three-run homer.

Dickie Noles closed out the ninth, as the Phils came back for the 14-8 win.

So the number-nine slot featured Munninghoff's triple and run scored, Vukovich's three bagger and run scored as a pinch-hitter for Hoff, and Moreland's pinch-hit, go-ahead, double in the eighth, which plated the run that eventually won the game.  At the very least, an oddly-productive day.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: Feb 15, 2016
Permalink  
 

seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:

Munninghoff played for Philly, and without checking the box score for the game, my guess is he hit a blooper that may have bounced on the turf if they played at the Vet that day, and gotten past the OF'er.


All I can find is that he hit it to right field leading off the third inning of a game in which he relieved Dick Ruthven, who got lit up.

Actually, the last two runs against Ruthven in a six-run second scored on consecutive base hits allowed by Munninghoff.

As you surmised, it was at the Vet.  Following his triple of unknown trajectory, he scored on a sac fly by Pete Rose.

Who knows?  It might have also been a cue shot down the right field line that got into the corner.

I can't find anything else in any of the google listings under "scott munninghoff triple."


 According to baseball reference, Cammack's triple was a liner to deep LF at Pro Player Stadium against the Marlins.  If I remember correctly (without looking), LF there was all sorts of funky, so quite possibly the ball rolled around a bit, or bounced off the angled wall.  To have a triple to deep LEFT FIELD by the pitcher, there must have been some odd circumstance.



-- Edited by nacster on Monday 15th of February 2016 03:57:11 PM

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 806
Date: Feb 17, 2016
Permalink  
 

As I typed out the very last sentence of my post...I thought to myself...there are others here that enjoy the "left field" trivia this game has such an abundance of.
I had an idea of whom would respond, for the most part, I was right. And, very definitive replys at that.
Thanks Nac and Seaj. And TT, very well could be...definitely a Seger connection with me!

__________________

I'd wake up at night with the smell of the ball park in my nose, the cool of the grass on my feet...The Thrill of the Grass...Heck, I'd play for free!

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard