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Post Info TOPIC: The Collective SOMERS Dictionary
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Third Base Coach

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Posts: 6298
Date: May 21, 2016
The Collective SOMERS Dictionary
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PFunkone used a great word "Erudite" in his Big Hair and Plastic Grass Revival League.  While I had a good idea of what the word meant, I looked it up via google and found a more exact definition.   That effort triggered the thought that we should have a collective dictionary where members see a word in someone's thread they find interesting, they can post along with its meaning and any other useful information.

Erudite (adjective) accodring to the Merriman Webster Dictionary means having or showing knowledge that is learned by studying.

Erudite derives via Middle English "erudite" from Latin eruditus, the past participle of the verb erudire, meaning "to instruct." A closer look at that verb shows that it is formed by combining the prefix e-, meaning "missing" or "absent," with the adjective "rudis," which means "rude" or "ignorant" and is also the source of our word rude. We typically use the word rude to mean "discourteous" or "uncouth" but it can also mean "lacking refinement" or "uncivilized"; someone who is erudite, therefore, has been transformed from a roughened or uninformed state to a polished and knowledgeable one through a devotion to learning.

 



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: May 23, 2016
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ap·pa·ri·tion
ˌapəˈriSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: apparition; plural noun: apparitions
  1. a ghost or ghostlike image of a person.
    synonyms:ghost, phantom, specter, spirit, wraith; More
    informalspook, chimera;
    rareeidolon
    "a monstrous apparition"


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Third Base Coach

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Date: Jun 3, 2016
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Good word, Boomer.  I like it.



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Third Base Coach

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Date: Jun 4, 2016
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I used the word "cop-out" in a thread and figured for the younger generation I should define it:

  • an excuse for not doing something

  • : something that avoids dealing with a problem in an appropriate way



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Third Base Coach

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Date: January 8th
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I saw this gem from Beer Farder:

But like his mentor, Buddy Ryan, who undermined Iron Mike Ditka at times, Gregg did the same with Joe Gibbs and Sean Payton. I even saw him get into it with Jeff Fisher last month. But we all make our Faustian bargains.

Well said, you man.

 



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Third Base Coach

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Date: January 15th
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Too funny. LOL.



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



General Manager

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Date: January 16th
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Beerfarder666 wrote:

The Packers beat the Cowboys earlier this afternoon (1-15-17) on a 51 yard field goal by Mason Crosby. Crosby also connected from 56 yards just a couple minutes earlier. Both kicks had a "fade" (golf term, meaning the ball drifts from left to right). Announcer Joe Buck called the 56 yarder a "knuckler", referring (erroneously) to the flutter effect produced by a knuckleball pitch in baseball.

During a December 16, 2007 Sunday night game at the New Jersey Meadowlands, Redskins' kicker Shaun Suisham booted a 49 yard field goal into a variable 18 mph crosswind. As the ball was kicked, it appeared to have a noticeable and conventional hook to it, then--more noticeably--faded sharply, allowing the ball to split the goalposts. Announcer Al Michaels correctly described Suisham's kick as a "screwball", the pitch in baseball that fades (left to right for righties, vice versa for southpaws).

Of course, Hall of Fame pitcher Christy Mathewson referred to his screwball as the "fadeaway".



 Just a hunch.......but the reason football play-by-play guys call a non-traditional kick (meaning one that is end over end) a "knuckler" is due to........the "non-traditional kick" and how it looks.....

Obviously a knuckler in baseball doesn't rotate.  But a place kicker VERY VERY rarely kicks a ball that doesn't go end over end, unless (like you mentioned above) you get an extremely windy day that basically takes the rotation off the ball.

The other time you see a ball kicked without the traditional end-over-end is when a place kicker badly hooks a kick; instead of end-over-end it goes sideways, and into any wind it just looks completely funky...........like this..............(start it at about the 1:20 mark and go through to the end and you get a great view of the sidespin)..........



-- Edited by nacster on Monday 16th of January 2017 02:37:12 AM

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