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Third Base Coach

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Date: Sep 3, 2016
Christie' Baseball Artifact Auction This October In NYC
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When this is in New York, I am going to make the time to visit the display. Anyone who is in NYC during that time and interested in seeing the exhibit, let me know.

THE GOLDEN AGE OF BASEBALL, SELECTIONS FROM THE NATIONAL PASTIME MUSEUM
 
CHRISTIE'S PRESENTS AN IMPORTANT COLLECTION OF BASEBALL MEMORABILIA AND PHOTOGRAPHY
 
TWO-DAY AUCTION IN NEW YORK, OCTOBER 19-20
New York -- August 31, 2016 -- Christie's is honored to present one of the most important and comprehensive collections of baseball memorabilia and photography ever offered at auction with The Golden Age of Baseball, Selections from the National Pastime Museum, a two-day auction on October 19-20 in New York. 
 
The sale is the largest collection of baseball ephemera to appear at an international auction 
house in more than 15 years. Comprised of a remarkable assemblage of game-used bats, 
letters, contracts, memorabilia and a treasury of vintage baseball photography, Part I of the sale is devoted to memorabilia and Part II is devoted to photography. With 485 lots in total, estimates start at $300-500 for photographs and memorabilia, while the top lot of the auction is a "Shoeless" Joe Jackson Professional Model Bat, estimated at $500,000-700,000. The contents of the auction are from the National Pastime Museum, which is an online museum based on a private collection of baseball artifacts.
 
"From baseball's earliest days through its golden era, the game's most iconic players are 
represented in this collection. Of particular interest are the remarkably rare items pertaining to 
The Negro Leagues and the legendary ballplayers who played in them," remarks Simeon 
Lipman, Christie's Consultant, Pop Culture.

The auction represents the legends of baseball, spanning more than 130 years from the 
inception of the game through modern day, with items owned and used by icons such as 
Babe Ruth, Mickey Mantle, Lou Gehrig, Willie Mays, Grover Cleveland Alexander, 
Jimmy Foxx, as well as a bat used by Derek Jeter. Letters and contracts from Ty Cobb, 
"Shoeless" Joe Jackson, and Cy Young, in addition to notable pieces relating to Jackie Robinson, Mike "King" Kelly, Roberto Clemente and Christy Mathewson are also available.
 
The collection is notable for some of the greatest artifacts extant relating to the Negro Leagues and its most celebrated stars such as Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, and Oscar Charleston.  Another feature of the collection is the significant amount of items and photographs detailing the history of Cuban baseball, including Cuban Cigarrillos cards and items signed by Martin DiHigo.
 
Other rare highlights of the auction include the ball that ended the 1909 World Series between 
the Pittsburgh Pirates and Detroit Tigers (estimate: $10,000-$15,000), and an 1898 contract from the pioneering woman in baseball, Lizzie Stride (Arlington) (estimate: $10,000-15,000).
 
Laura Paulson, Chairman, Christie's Americas, comments, "The collection, one of the most comprehensive and distinguished of its kind, includes extraordinary offerings that chronicle the profound social and cultural  significance of America's National Pastime.This is a rare opportunity for collectors and enthusiasts to experience and own rare and historical memorabilia, artifacts, and photographs which tell the story of a game that continues to create passion and excitement season after season. We are honored to be presenting this collection to the public and look forward to sharing its treasures in the next months as it tours the United States and in our exhibition galleries in Rockefeller Center in October."
 
Public Exhibitions:
September 26-27 | JW Marriott | 151 W Adams St, Chicago, IL (select highlights on view)
October 10-13 | Jules Maeght Gallery | 149 Gough Street, San Francisco, CA (select highlights on view)
October 13-19 | Christie's | 20 Rockefeller Plaza, New York (entire collection on view)
 
For more information, visit www.christies.com/baseball.


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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Umpire

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Awesome

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Upper Level - Outfield Ticket

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Tall T I am seriously thinking about going to see this on Wed 10/19. I am a 2 hour bus ride from the city.

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Third Base Coach

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Date: Sep 4, 2016
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Awesome! I'd love to attend it with you. I will send you a PM.



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Pretty cool. All the worthwhile stuff happens somewhere far away...no



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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I might check it out, though I'm not sure when.

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General Manager

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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pfunkone wrote:

Pretty cool. All the worthwhile stuff happens somewhere far away...no


 Funny how you say that, I feel the same way about things on the West Coast...........

The other thing is........people hear "New York City" and automatically think anything located in New York is 20 minutes from NYC.  Besides the two ballgames I went to last month, I have never been to NYC.  I live 350 miles from there, and anyone I tell I live in New York always come back with "that's awesome, I would love to go there", and I have to tell them I have never been myself, and they get all confused.  I actually live half as close to Toronto (3 hour drive) then NY, but people not from around here think Toronto is located in Siberia or something LOL.

 



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"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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You're all closer than you think.

96001b9c6594229fb7468303c0e26157.jpg



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General Manager

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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This is for reference..........all of you know where NYC is obviously...........I live in Rochester (on Lake Ontario).  Note where Toronto is (also on the Lake, but the North side).

This should help you out when I talk about distance...........in fact, Pittsburgh and Cleveland, and even Detroit are closer to me then NYC...........

 

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-- Edited by nacster on Thursday 8th of September 2016 02:51:13 PM

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Third Base Coach

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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Anyone who has been to the Baseball Hall of Fame should have a pretty good idea of how far you can drive in NY state and not see civilization. 

It is a very rural and beautiful state, but New York city skews people's perception.  Pittsburgh is 5 hours from Philadelphia and you are almost the same distance. 

BTW, how long does it take you to travel to Toronto on dog sleighs during the winter?

 



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Third Base Coach

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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BTW, Cheffigs and I are meeting on October 19 to view the collection.  Let me know if you are interested in meeting us that afternoon.



__________________

Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



General Manager

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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Tall Tactician wrote:

Anyone who has been to the Baseball Hall of Fame should have a pretty good idea of how far you can drive in NY state and not see civilization. 

It is a very rural and beautiful state, but New York city skews people's perception.  Pittsburgh is 5 hours from Philadelphia and you are almost the same distance. 

BTW, how long does it take you to travel to Toronto on dog sleighs during the winter?

 


 We get an average of exactly 100 inches of snow a year.  This year was really mild, both in temperature and snow level.  We had 63 inches of snow, and over a third of that was in a 36-hour snowstorm we had.  All of NY State hardly got any snow.  Here are the totals of the main cities.........

Toronto actually gets less snow then we do, due to their location above Lake Ontario.  They don't get the "Lake Effect" snow due to wind and location on the Lake (either Ontario or Erie).

 

U.S. Northeast[edit]

 
Lake effect snow bands over Central New York
 
Map showing some of the lake-effect snow areas of the United States

Cold winds in the winter typically prevail from the northwest in the Great Lakes region, producing the most dramatic lake-effect snowfalls on the southern and eastern shores of the Great Lakes. This lake-effect produces a significant difference between the snowfall on the southern/eastern shores and the northern and western shores of the Great Lakes.

The most affected areas include Central New YorkWestern New YorkNorthwestern PennsylvaniaNortheastern Ohiosouthwestern Ontario and central Ontario, Northeastern Illinois (along the shoreline of Lake Michigan), northwestern and northcentral Indiana (mostly between Gary, IN and Elkhart, IN), and western MichiganTug Hill in New York's North Country region has the 2nd most snow amounts of any non-mountainous location within the continental U.S., only trailing the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, which can average over 200 inches (508 centimeters) of snow per year.[12]

Lake-effect snows on the Tug Hill (east of Lake Ontario) can frequently set daily records for snowfall in the United States. Tug Hill receives, on average, over 20 feet (240 in; 610 cm) of snow each winter.[13] In February 2007, a prolonged lake-effect snow event left 141 inches (358 cm) of snow on the Tug Hill Plateau.[14] Syracuse, New York, is directly south of the Tug Hill Plateau and receives significant lake-effect snow from Lake Ontario, averaging 115.6 inches (294 cm) of snow per year, which is enough snowfall to often be considered one of the "snowiest" large cities in America.[15][16]

A small amount of lake-effect snow from the Finger Lakes falls in upstate New York as well. The Appalachian Mountains and Atlantic Ocean largely shield New York City and Philadelphia from picking up any lake-effect snow; snow there tends to come from mesocyclonic storm systems mixing with cold temperatures.

Lake Erie produces a similar effect for a zone stretching from the eastern suburbs of Cleveland through Erie to Buffalo.[17] Remnants of lake-effect snows from Lake Erie have been observed to reach as far as Garrett County, Maryland.[18] Because it's not as deep as the other lakes, Erie warms rapidly in the spring and summer and is frequently the only Great Lake to freeze over in winter. .[19] Once frozen, the resulting ice cover alleviates lake-effect snow downwind of the lake. Based on stable isotope evidence from lake sediment coupled with historical records of increasing lake effect snow, it has been predicted that Global Warming will result in a further increase in lake effect snow.[20]

A very large snowbelt in the United States exists on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, near the cities of HoughtonMarquette, and Munising. These areas average 250–300 inches (635–762 cm) of snow each season.[21] For comparison, on the western shore, Duluth, Minnesota receives 78 inches (198 cm) per season.[22] Lake Superior and Lake Huron rarely freeze because of their size and depth; hence, lake-effect snow can fall continually in the Upper Peninsula and Canadian snowbelts during the winter months. Main areas of the Upper Peninsula snow belt include the Keweenaw Peninsula and BaragaMarquette and Alger counties, where Lake Superior contributes to lake-effect snow, making them a prominent part of the Midwestern snow belt. Records of 390 inches (991 cm) of snow or more have been set in many communities in this area. The Keweenaw Peninsula averages more snowfall than almost anywhere in the United States—more than anywhere east of the Mississippi River and the most of all non-mountainous regions of the continental United States. Because of the howling storms across Lake Superior, which cause dramatic amounts of precipitation, it has been said that the lake-effect snow makes the Keweenaw Peninsula the snowiest place east of the Rockies. Only one official weather station exists in this region. Located in Han****, Michigan, this station averages well over 210 inches (533 cm) per year. Farther north in the peninsula, lake-effect snow can occur with any wind direction. The road commission in Keweenaw County, Michigancollects unofficial data in a community called Deleware, and it strictly follows the guidelines set forth by the National Weather Service. This station averages over 240 inches (610 cm) per season. Even farther north, a ski resort called Mount Bohemia receives an unofficial annual average of 273 inches (693 cm). Herman, Michigan, averages 236 inches (599 cm) of snow every year. Lake-effect snow can cause blinding whiteouts in just minutes, and some storms can last days.

Western Michigan, western Northern Lower Michigan, and Northern Indiana can get heavy lake-effect snows as winds pass over Lake Michigan and deposit snows overMuskegonTraverse CityGrand RapidsKalamazooNew CarlisleSouth Bend, and Elkhart, but these snows abate significantly before Lansing or Fort Wayne, Indiana. When winds become northerly, or aligned between 330 and 390 degrees, a single band of lake-effect snow may form, which extends down the length of Lake Michigan. This long fetch often produces a very intense, yet localized, area of heavy snowfall, affecting cities such as Laporte and Gary Indiana.[23]

Lake-effect snow is uncommon in DetroitToledoMilwaukee, and Chicago, because the region's dominant winds are from the northwest, making them upwind from their respective Great Lakes. However, they too can see lake-effect snow during easterly or north-easterly winds. More frequently, the north side of a low-pressure system picks up more moisture over the lake as it travels west, creating a phenomenon called lake-enhanced precipitation.[23]

Because Southwestern Ontario is surrounded by water on three sides, many parts of Southwestern and Central Ontario get a large part of their winter snow from lake-effect snow.[24] This region is notorious for the whiteouts which can suddenly reduce highway visibility on the world's busiest highway (Ontario Highway 401) from clear to zero. The region most commonly affected spans from Port Stanley in the west, Brantford and the Bruce Peninsula in the north, Niagara-on-the-Lake to the east, and Fort Erie to the south. The heaviest accumulations usually happen in the Bruce Peninsula, which is between Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. So long as the Great Lakes are not frozen over, the only time the Bruce Peninsula does not get lake-effect snow is when the wind is directly from the south.

Toronto and Hamilton are usually spared lake-effect squalls because they are not on the leeward side of Lake Ontario during the dominant northwest winds. However, some central and northern portions of the Greater Toronto Area can be affected a few times each year by lake-effect snow from Georgian Bay. Downtown Toronto and Hamilton get most of their lake-effect snow when the wind comes from the southeast or east, over Lake Ontario. Such easterly winds are usually associated with a winter cyclone passing just to the south of the Great Lakes.

 

GSB CitiesThis Year 2015Normal Average to DateThis Time 
Last Season
Normal Seasons AverageAll Time Season 
Snowfall Record


Syracuse80.3123.7119.7123.8192.1 inches (1992 - 1993)
Rochester63.799.1101.999.5161.7 inches (1959 - 1960)
Buffalo55.194.4112.994.7199.4 inches (1976 - 1977)
Binghamton32.083.393.483.4134.0 inches (1995 - 1996)
Albany16.960.275.959.1112.5 inches (1970 - 1971)


__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

33 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

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Date: Sep 8, 2016
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nacster wrote:
pfunkone wrote:

Pretty cool. All the worthwhile stuff happens somewhere far away...no


 Funny how you say that, I feel the same way about things on the West Coast...........

The other thing is........people hear "New York City" and automatically think anything located in New York is 20 minutes from NYC.  Besides the two ballgames I went to last month, I have never been to NYC.  I live 350 miles from there, and anyone I tell I live in New York always come back with "that's awesome, I would love to go there", and I have to tell them I have never been myself, and they get all confused.  I actually live half as close to Toronto (3 hour drive) then NY, but people not from around here think Toronto is located in Siberia or something LOL.

 


It's all relative.

As far as a Seattleite like myself is concerned, you might as well be next door neighbors in Outer Mongolia. wink



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Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Third Base Coach

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Date: Oct 12, 2016
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Tall Tactician wrote:

BTW, Cheffigs and I are meeting on October 19 to view the collection.  Let me know if you are interested in meeting us that afternoon.


I am looking forward to seeing the collection with Cheffigs on Wednesday, Oct 19 in the afternoon. It is an open invitation to anyone who might be interested in joining us.



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.



Third Base Coach

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Date: Oct 30, 2016
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Cheffigs and I (TT) met up in New York and had a great time at Christies Auction. The artifacts that were auctioned off were the private collection of Frank Ceresi who formed The National Pastime Museum.

Initially, we believed we were attending the event on the last day of the public viewing of the event. Unfortunately, that was not the case. The press release indicated that there would be a public viewing on the date we attended, but it also listed it as the first day of the auction. I had discovered the error the week before and was able to view the collection the previous week. I will post pictures of the artifacts in subsequent posts.

I notified Cheffigs of the error and we decided we would the auction although we were not intending to bid on any items. It was very interesting as I had never attended an auction before. The auctioneer had a sense of humor and a sense of humor as he went through the items. We arrived at the auction shortly after 1 p.m. for an auction that started at 10 a.m. There were about 500 lots to be auctioned, most lots containing one item, and being auctioned over 2 days. The lots moved quickly with  most taking only 1-2 minutes apeice. We saw about 50 lots auctioned off ranging from $1,400 (a handwritten letter by Ty Cobb) to $240,000 (a Jackie Robinson Model Bat). Cheffigs and I made sure we did not scratch our noses throughout the afternoon! The auctioneer was focused, but had a sense of humor and personality. He was a Boston fan and joked about the Boston - New York rivalry. When a Yankees' artifact was moving slowly he would ask "Where's your Yankees' Pride."

For each lot, there was an expected range as to what the lot would yield. Most seemed to fall within their range, but there were some "bargains" and some that fetched premium pricing. Ironically, the previously mentioned Robinson bat, the highest priced item auctioned while we were there was also the biggest bargain. Its estimated price was anticipated to be between $300,000 to $400,000, so it was a 20% off sale. A Roy Campanella model bat was expected to bring in $50 k - $70 k but went for a cool $32 K. Bet you wished you had been there to pick up that deal. On the premium side, there was a Sandy Koufax 1955 Topps Baseball card that was expected to sell for $50 k - $80 k. This little gem sold for $130 k. One bidder in the back of the room refused to be denied a Johnny Bench model bat. The bat was expected to yield between $4 K - $6 k but wound up selling for over 100% at a cool $13 k. The last lot we saw auctioned was a Derek Jeter bat which went for $10,000, a $5,000 discount. Jeter used the bat on May 23, 2001 when he went 5-5, hitting for the cycle.

After the auction, we made our way to Lower Manhattan for Italian cuisine. It was a restaurant highly recommended by Cheffigs (not to mention the reviews online. He knows the chef there. It is his son. We were later joined by his wife who was in New York for training that afternoon. During dinner, we discussed our SOMers, our histories, families, the upcoming election, and so much more. It was a great day/evening.

 

TT and Cheffigs.jpg

 

Christies Auctioneer.jpg

 

Christies Auctioneer 2.jpg

 



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Baseball ... this field, this game ... It is part of our past.  It reminds us all of what once was good -- and could be again.

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