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Post Info TOPIC: Mortality knocks
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VP of Operations

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Date: January 9th
Mortality knocks
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I can't believe I did that. hmm

I also can't imagine how the heck I would have even had Jackie Harris on my mind.

At least I got the right Bob Sadowski.



-- Edited by seajaw on Monday 9th of January 2017 06:08:33 PM

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VP of Operations

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Date: January 9th
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I remember the 1920 St. Louis Browns have John Shovlin in the SOM team set, despite the fact that he had just seven at bats.

The Browns, however, had just 12 position players with more than a dozen games played. The middle infielders -- Joe Gedeon and Wally Gerber -- played 153 and 154 games, respectively.

Shovlin had no starts, two PH appearances, and five games finished at short.

BTW...did you know Joe Gedeon was banned from baseball for having bet on the 1919 World Series? He had inside knowledge of the fix, as it was later discovered. I found that out when I was doing research for my 1920 replay.

After receiving grant of immunity at the trial, he testified that he received a tip (from Swede Risberg, as it was late revealed) and bet.

I'm guessing he is the only player in MLB history to start in all of his team's games one season, then never appear again (Buck Weaver missed one game for Chicago that year).

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VP of Operations

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Date: January 11th
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Billy Champion, former hurler with the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers from 1969-'76, passed away at the age of 69 in Shelby, AL.

Champion posted a career W-L mark of 34-50, but had a fine year in '74 for the Brew Crew, going 11-4, with a 3.62 ERA.

He later went to China as part of the Major League Baseball International Development program, and was also a scout for several ML organizations.

www.shelbystar.com/news/20170109/billy-champion-dies-at-age-69

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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: January 11th
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Greg Jelks, who played in 10 games for the Phillies in the last six weeks of the '87 season, died Friday, Jan. 6th. He was sleeping on a flight to Australia after visiting his mother in Alabama, and could not be reawakened.

He was 55.

After his short stint with the Phils, Jelks became a manager for several independent teams across the country, and for the Australian Baseball League. He became a dual citizen and represented Australia in the 2000 Sydney Olympics and 2006 World Baseball Classic.

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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: January 11th
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Removed wrote:
seajaw wrote:

Billy Champion, former hurler with the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers from 1969-'76, passed away at the age of 69 in Shelby, AL.

Champion posted a career W-L mark of 34-50, but had a fine year in '74 for the Brew Crew, going 11-4, with a 3.62 ERA.

He later went to China as part of the Major League Baseball International Development program, and was also a scout for several ML organizations.

www.shelbystar.com/news/20170109/billy-champion-dies-at-age-69


 Champion's SAVD S-O-M cards from 1971 and 1973 showed him to be a very good fielder. 1  e14 and 1 e 11, respectively. The aspect of pitcher fielding becomes more important, exciting, and realistic for those gamers who home brew nuances into pitcher errors. The SADV pitcher fielding range and errors, under some home brewed rules (Glenn Guzzo is rumored to use this) are factored into the SAVD charts for bunts, pickoff attempts, outfielder throws that the pitcher backs up, and gb (p) X plays.

So, when Billy comes in, say, in relief, this fielding aspect, especially in possible bunt situations, becomes crucial during certain times as to the decision of who to bring in to pitch in a particular situation. This has always (since 1987 based cards) been true of the pitcher's hold factor as well. These advancements in the simulated Strat game have served to make it an even more fantastic game to play.

Thanks you Seajaw for passing this info along about Billy's passing.


You're welcome.

Champion and Jelks both made strong contributions as part of baseball's global outreach program.  They were baseball ambassadors.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: January 21st
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Red Adams passed away Thursday. He was 95.

He wasn't a player in our era, but his reach extended well beyond his playing days.

Adams' Major League career lasted just eight games, all in the season of 1946. He was 0-1 for the Chicago Cubs.

Adams wound up winning 193 minor league games, mostly in the Pacific Coast League.

But his guidance undeniably helped the careers of Don Sutton, Tommy John and many others in a post-player career that spanned 21 seasons. Adams joined the Los Angeles Dodgers' staff as a scout in 1959, becoming the club's pitching coach in 1969.

"Red Adams is a standard by which every pitching coach should be measured. No person ever meant more to me in my career than Red Adams, and without him I wouldn't be standing in Cooperstown today." - Don Sutton



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: January 24th
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Former pitcher Dick Starr died Wednesday.  He was 95.

Starr was signed by the Yankees in 1941.  He enlisted in the Army in 1942 and spent three years in the service, winding up in the Pacific Theater.  Starr made his way from Hawaii, to Guadalcanal, Palau Island, New Caledonia, the Philippines, and on to Japan, earning three Bronze Stars.

In 1946, he returned to the Yankee organization, getting a call-up at the end of the '47 season.

Starr spent parts of five seasons in the Major Leagues, compiling a 12-24 mark, with a 5.25 ERA. He was 7-5, 5.02, for the Browns in 1950.

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/c8d09106

I am happy to report that he tossed a six-hit shutout over the Senators in my '50 replay yesterday.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: January 26th
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Righthander Ken Wright, who pitched parts of five seasons with the Kansas City Royals and New York Yankees back in the 1970's died Sat., Jan. 21st.

He was 70.

Signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1964, he was acquired by the Royals in the expansion draft.

Wright posted a career mark of 11-15 with eight saves, all with the Royals, from 1970-'73. He was then dealt to New York along with outfielder Lou Piniella, in exchange for reliever Lindy McDaniel. Wright pitched in three games for New York in '74, before he was dealt to the Phillies for pitcher Mike Wallace.

He retired that season, due to injuries.

I really had to search to find his obituary, linking through his wiki page, which is barely a stub.

According to his obituary, Wright evidently work in insurance, real estate, heating and air conditioning, and he coached little league baseball. He was also helped establish the Warrington (Pensacola, FL) Emergency Aid Center, serving as the WEAC manager for the last 16 years.

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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: February 1st
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Former Phillies outfielder and ace pinch-hitter Bob Bowman passed away Friday.

He was 85.

Bowman played five season for the Phillies -- 1955-'59 -- and banged out 21 hits in 81 career attempts as a pinch-hitter.  Four of his pinch knocks were home runs.

In 1958, Bowman compiled 13 pinch hits in 32 at bats (.406) with three homers, and was acclaimed the league's top pinch hitter.

Bowman posted a .249 career batting average.  The '58 season was his best.  Overall, he batted .288 in 202 plate appearances that season.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Bullpen Coach

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Date: February 1st
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seajaw wrote:

Former Phillies outfielder and ace pinch-hitter Bob Bowman passed away Friday.

He was 85.

Bowman played five season for the Phillies -- 1955-'59 -- and banged out 21 hits in 81 career attempts as a pinch-hitter.  Four of his pinch knocks were home runs.

In 1958, Bowman compiled 13 pinch hits in 32 at bats (.406) with three homers, and was acclaimed the league's top pinch hitter.

Bowman posted a .249 career batting average.  The '58 season was his best.  Overall, he batted .288 in 202 plate appearances that season.


Bowman is playing real well for me in a 1957 replay.  I use him in left field against lefties and sit Rip Repulski (love that name) and I use him to pinch hit a lot. He is hitting .308 as a pinch hitter with 1 homerun - a slammer.  By the way, thanks for doing this Seajaw.  I really appreciate knowing about these players lives.  Makes it more poignant as I am playing.



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VP of Operations

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Date: February 1st
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You're welcome.

When you have these guys in your replays, it really hits home. Especially if you like to dig into the archives and learn about them.

Some players may have been guys you saw on the field, or maybe even got an autograph. They might have even been members of your community.

A bartender at the Elks Club my parents used to go to was a former Major League pitcher, Bill Kennedy. Kennedy wound up marrying one my aunts, who had been widowed.

He was in my '48 campaign, and will also appear in '49 and '51.  I hope I can roll him a few wins. wink



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: March 12th
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With the reformat at baseref, I lost track of the recent passings in Major League Baseball.

There have been several of note in the past few weeks:

Bill Hands, a righthander who pitched for 11 seasons in the big leagues, mostly with the Chicago Cubs, died March 9th in Orlando, FL.  Hands posted a career W/L record of 111-110, with an ERA of 3.35 for the Giants, Cubs ('66-'72), Twins and Rangers.

He won 16, 20 and 18 games for the Cubs, from '68-'70.

Ned Garver, another righthander whose Major League career lasted from 1948-'61, died Feb. 26th, in Bryan, OH.

Garver was a star amongst a sad lot for many of those seasons, toiling for the St. Louis Browns from '48 until he was dealt to Detroit in 1952.  It took three more years before he ever pitched for a team with a winning record, when the Tigers posted a 79-75 mark in 1955.

Garver was hurt and missed most of the '56 campaign, then was sent to Kansas City in '57.  He pitched through the 1960 season for the A's, and finished his career with the expansion Los Angeles Angels in 1961.

Don't be fooled by his career record of 129-157, and 3.73 ERA.  Garver was an All-Star and finished second in the A.L. MVP voting in 1951, with his 20-12, 3.73, mark and league-leading 24 CGs, for the hapless 52-102 Brownies.

Garver was also noted for his hitting skills early in his career.  He was 5-16 as a pinch hitter from 1948-'51.  In all plate appearances during those four years, he batted .269 (88-327), with 15 doubles, two triples and three home runs.  He also walked more times than he struck out (33-29) in those PAs.

He was an uncle of former Major League pitcher Bruce Berenyi.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

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Date: March 12th
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seajaw wrote:

With the reformat at baseref, I lost track of the recent passings in Major League Baseball.

There have been several of note in the past few weeks:

Bill Hands, a righthander who pitched for 11 seasons in the big leagues, mostly with the Chicago Cubs, died March 9th in Orlando, FL.  Hands posted a career W/L record of 111-110, with an ERA of 3.35 for the Giants, Cubs ('66-'72), Twins and Rangers.

He won 16, 20 and 18 games for the Cubs, from '68-'70.

Ned Garver, another righthander whose Major League career lasted from 1948-'61, died Feb. 26th, in Bryan, OH.

Garver was a star amongst a sad lot for many of those seasons, toiling for the St. Louis Browns from '48 until he was dealt to Detroit in 1952.  It took three more years before he ever pitched for a team with a winning record, when the Tigers posted a 79-75 mark in 1955.

Garver was hurt and missed most of the '56 campaign, then was sent to Kansas City in '57.  He pitched through the 1960 season for the A's, and finished his career with the expansion Los Angeles Angels in 1961.

Don't be fooled by his career record of 129-157, and 3.73 ERA.  Garver was an All-Star and finished second in the A.L. MVP voting in 1951, with his 20-12, 3.73, mark and league-leading 24 CGs, for the hapless 52-102 Brownies.

Garver was also noted for his hitting skills early in his career.  He was 5-16 as a pinch hitter from 1948-'51.  In all plate appearances during those four years, he batted .269 (88-327), with 15 doubles, two triples and three home runs.  He also walked more times than he struck out (33-29) in those PAs.

He was an uncle of former Major League pitcher Bruce Berenyi.


 There are soooooooo many players from the era of the late 30's-late 50's that got stuck on perennially brutal teams, with no way out (unless you were on the Kansas City-New York train).

Probably the best of the bunch (non-Ralph Kiner HOF types) was Ed Yost, who came around 50 years too early.  His OBP at a premium defensive position would make Billy Beane sprout.



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Third Base Coach

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Date: March 14th
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LOL Very punny, Nac.



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Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

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Date: March 20th
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Major league pitcher Bob Bruce passed away on March 15 at the age of 83.

Bruce debuted in 1959 with the Detroit Tigers and went on to a record of 5-10, with an ERA of 3.97 in 176 2/3 innings. He was traded to the Houston Colt .45s and was a member of the expansion team in 1962. He went on to pitch five seasons for Houston, going 42-58 with an ERA of 3.78 in 907 innings. Bruce pitched for the Atlanta Braves in 1967, his final season, with a record of 2-3 and an ERA of 4.89 in 38 2/3 innings. He was also the first pitcher in Houston Colt .45s/Astros history to record 15 wins in a season and was the starting pitcher in the first official game inside the Astrodome.

He finished with a career record of 49-71 with an ERA of 3.85 in 1122 1/3 innings.

On April 19, 1964, Bob Bruce became the seventh NL and 12th in MLB history to pitch a nine strike/three strikeout inning.

 

"Bob Bruce, Astros' starting pitcher in first Astrodome official game, dies"

 

 

Also on March 15, American League umpire Russ Goetz passed away at the age of 86. Goetz umpired in 2,384 games, including two World Series (1973, 1979), four ALCS (1970, 1974, 1977, 1981) and two All-Star games (1970, 1975). He was one of the last five umpires to use the big balloon outside chest protectors.

 

Russell L. Goetz Obituary

 

 

And for the fans of the ladies pro league, started during the WWII years, Arleene Johnson of the AAGPBL passed away on March 14 at the age of 93. She pitched one season for the Fort Wayne Daisies before joining the Muskegon Lassies. She played third base and shortstop during her career that stretched from 1945-1948. She also led the league in fielding percentage at third base for three straight seasons, including an AAGPBL record .942 in 1947 which stood until Ernestine Petras broke the record in 1952 with a fielding percentage of .965. She is also part of Women in Baseball, a display based at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY.

 

Obituary of Arleene Noga

 

 

Just thought that I would help out and catch everyone else.



-- Edited by captaincarl8 on Monday 20th of March 2017 10:20:11 PM

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