SOMers - Stratomatic Baseball

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Strat O Matic New Rule-The Defensive Shift
«First  <  1 2 | Page of 2  sorted by


VIP Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 414
Date: Dec 15, 2016
RE: Strat O Matic New Rule-The Defensive Shift
Permalink  
 


Nitrous Oxide wrote:
seajaw wrote:

Interestingly, though, the best-known instance of an extreme shift being deployed prior to the 2000's was the Williams shift.  But Williams never tried to beat the shift.  It never affected his approach.  He never tried to go the other way.

Would you dare to have Teddy Ballgame try to beat the shift? wink


 Ted actually spent a lot of time trying to beat the shift. Paul Waner was the guy he that was helping him hit to left field. The 1946 series showed the league it worked on him and he began to see a steady dose of it. He started using a heavier bet to give him more natural movement to left field.


  Well, we can figure that one, also. What if Ted always tried to beat the shift. The chart for beat the shift would translate into 6AB 3H 1DO or .500/.500/.667. All HRs hit when trying to beat the shift will be reduced by half (on either the batter or pitcher card). But 50% of the time the shift can not be applied. 

The other 50% of the time, 10% of that will come off the defensive shift chart (again 5% on average will come off this chart). The remaining 45% will come off the batter/pitcher card where the HRs will be reduced in half with 1/3 becoming doubles, 1/6 singles.

If the shift is always applied (when no runners)  HRs are reduced by 72.5% = (.5 + .45*.5) = (% no shift + % shift(not from shift chart)*reduction from trying to beat shift)

Approach        AB        H       2B    3B      HR      BB    HBP   AVG    OBP   SLG
 No Shift456185333371473.406.553.735
  SWING463181343371403.391.535.717
   BEAT463191423271403.413.551.691
 
  





__________________


VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16147
Date: Dec 16, 2016
Permalink  
 

Nitrous Oxide wrote:
seajaw wrote:

Interestingly, though, the best-known instance of an extreme shift being deployed prior to the 2000's was the Williams shift.  But Williams never tried to beat the shift.  It never affected his approach.  He never tried to go the other way.

Would you dare to have Teddy Ballgame try to beat the shift? wink


 Ted actually spent a lot of time trying to beat the shift. Paul Waner was the guy he that was helping him hit to left field. The 1946 series showed the league it worked on him and he began to see a steady dose of it. He started using a heavier bat to give him more natural movement to left field.


Interesting.  I wasn't aware of that.

Still, did he actually try to hit the ball the other way, or go with the idea that the heavier bat would slow down his swing enough to produce the desired effect?



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



Umpire

Status: Offline
Posts: 9221
Date: Dec 16, 2016
Permalink  
 

seajaw wrote:
Nitrous Oxide wrote:
seajaw wrote:

Interestingly, though, the best-known instance of an extreme shift being deployed prior to the 2000's was the Williams shift.  But Williams never tried to beat the shift.  It never affected his approach.  He never tried to go the other way.

Would you dare to have Teddy Ballgame try to beat the shift? wink


 Ted actually spent a lot of time trying to beat the shift. Paul Waner was the guy he that was helping him hit to left field. The 1946 series showed the league it worked on him and he began to see a steady dose of it. He started using a heavier bat to give him more natural movement to left field.


Interesting.  I wasn't aware of that.

Still, did he actually try to hit the ball the other way, or go with the idea that the heavier bat would slow down his swing enough to produce the desired effect?


 In 1948 he hit .369 but his power dropped 25 Homeruns. The drop in power was due to him going to left field. To opposing managers they saw Williams had figured out how to beat the shift and just gave up putting the shift on. 1949 He blasted 43 dingers. He wasn't facing the shift that often. Its all detailed in this book.

BOOK3-blog427.jpg

What it does the Williams case does do it illustrate is the intent of Strat's new rule. If you want to beat the shift you power will suffer a bit. I intend to give the rule a try. I'll be curious how I like it. I don't use every rule Strat has, but I at least tried them all to see what I thought of them.



__________________


Umpire

Status: Offline
Posts: 9221
Date: February 13th
Permalink  
 

This is what the computer help file says about the shift.

 

This optional Max Rule can be selected to enable defensive shifts in the game.  

 

When using this rule the defense can select "Defensive Shift" from the Position Defense dialog.  When it does so the fielders are shown in their shifted position on the screen and the word "SHIFT" is shown on the infield to remind you that the shift is on.

 

When the offense clicks or selects "Swing Away" a new dialog appears that offers two choices.  The offense can either swing away or they can choose to try to beat the shift ("Beat Shift").  Choosing to "Swing Away" means the batter will not alter his approach even though it means that his batting average will go down.  However, choosing "Beat Shift" means that the batter will try to beat the shift by hitting the ball the other way through the vacated side of the infield.  This will increase his batting average, but the downside is that it comes at the cost of reducing some of his power.

 

Whenever the Defensive Shift rule kicks in it will make notations in the play-by-play area to indicate that some outcome has occurred as a result of the rule.  For example, it will say "(Shift - Ball hit other way beats the shift!)" when the "Beat Shift" option has resulted in a base hit.

 

DESIGN NOTES:

Defensive shifts have been used in the major leagues for many years.  Even before the famous "Ted Williams Shift" was used the shift had been deployed on occasion.  However, it was not until the 2010s that the use of these defensive shifts exploded.

 

There are different kinds of shifts utilized in the major leagues, including full and partial shifts.  For purposes of this rule we only allow for the full "Ted Williams" style shift.  That shift places three infielders on the pull side of the infield.  In our game we only allow shifts when the bases are empty because that is when the full "Ted Williams" shift is normally deployed in real-life.

 

Additionally, some major league teams will move the fielders around in such a way so that they no longer appear as 3b/ss/2b/1b from left to right across the infield.  Even though that sometimes happens it can be confusing as to which fielder has the ball so in our game so we always position the fielders in the natural order from left to right across the screen.

 

There is a purposeful risk/reward built into this rule that allows the offense a choice when the defense utilizes the shift.  If your opponent is too quick to shift you should sometimes use the "Beat Shift" option which will raise your batters average at the expense of some of his power.  After getting burned with a few base hits your opponent might not be so willing to shift.  However, if you overuse the "Beat Shift" option you too might get burned as a ball that would have been pulled over the fence for a home run might end up being an opposite field double instead.

 

Note that this rule has the ability to alter the statistical accuracy of the game if it is abused.  For example, if the batters never try to defeat the shift with "Beat Shift" then the league batting average could drop a point or two.  However with normal usage this rule will not significantly effect your statistics. 

 

COMPUTER MANAGER NOTES:

The computer manager has been fine-tuned to shift an appropriate amount according to the year being played with.  Since defensive shift stats are only available back until 2010 we have feathered the computer manager's use of defensive shifts down in the years 2009 through 2006.  Prior to 2006 the computer manager will never use the defensive shift as it was a rarely use strategy before that year.

 



__________________


Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 631
Date: March 30th
Permalink  
 

It's a good thing that it is an optional rule because I would never use it unless I was playing face-to-face. I won't use it in any replays because since the cards are created based on the stats of the season being replayed, then the stats from when the player had to face a shift is already included.



__________________


Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 631
Date: March 30th
Permalink  
 

Believe it or not, the "Williams shift" was not created to stop TED Williams, but KEN Williams. It was more famously used, however, when Ted Williams was at bat.

__________________


Luxury Box Season Ticket Holder

Status: Offline
Posts: 700
Date: March 30th
Permalink  
 

Shifts of varying degrees of severity have been used since the late nineteenth century.

__________________


Upper Level - Outfield Ticket

Status: Offline
Posts: 21
Date: 3 days ago
Permalink  
 

I'm thinking of taking the shift option off. In my few random games with the 2016 season, the shift seems to be on almost every player and its quite annoying. I get it in a way but like others have said, the cards are already stat for performance that year.. Seems like guys would have a better or worse year just by keeping the shift on. Until like someone else said, we get def. shift ratings on cards, I think it maniuplates the system in a way not intended.

Could be totally wrong.

__________________
«First  <  1 2 | Page of 2  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard