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VP of Operations

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Date: February 7th
1950 Gene Hermanski
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I was looking at my 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers, trying to figure out what was going on with Gene Hermanski.

I can't find anything pertaining to injuries.  He batted .290 in 1948, and .299 a year later, as they eased him into more of a platoon role.

His top competition for the left field job was George Shuba.  Shuba batted .267 as a rookie for the Brooks in '48.  He couldn't make the roster out of Spring Training in '49, and spent almost all of the season at Mobile, in the Southern Association, where he hit .328, with 28 home runs.

Now, the Dodgers may have wanted more power out of the left field slot, but Hermanski was a much better all-around player.  Better hitter, better (and faster) baserunner, and a better fielder.

Anyway, Shuba bonked early in the '50 season, platooning with Jim Russell.  He was sent to Montreal after hitting just .207 in 128 trips to the plate.  As a result, Hermanski took on the playing time against righties, slashing .298/.379/.444/.823 the rest of the way.

The rest of the PT was going to Russell and Tommy Brown.  Brown had a great season pinch-hitting, but was a terrible outfielder.  Russell was an outstanding flychaser with some isolated pop, but his career was clearly in decline after being hurt in '48.

Hermanski was clearly the best of the three options.  When it came down to the final week of the season, Brooklyn was five games behind the Phils.  I can't knock Brooklyn's winning six of nine (they had three straight doubleheaders).

But the Phils lost five of their final seven games, squeaking it out on the final day of the season...against Brooklyn.

The Phils sent Bob Miller and Robin Roberts -- two righthanders -- to the hill in the season-ending two-game mini-series.  Certainly, you think Hermanski would get those starts in left field.

But he didn't.  Rookie Cal Abrams started.  Both games.  In fact, he started the final three games for Brooklyn (they won two).  Abrams batted .205 in 54 PA's.

Hermanski never left the bench.  Was he sick?  Injured?  Suspended?  I can't find any details.  His SABR Bio says nothing more than "Playing primarily against right-handed pitchers, he had developed into a consistent hitter."  No mention of why he might have missed those crucial games.

The splits are conflicted.  Hermanski batted just .200 (10-50) against Phillie pitching.  He hit .286 (8-30) in games at Shibe Park, and he was evidently either 2-20 or 2-22 versus the Phils at Ebbets Field.

Interestingly, I counted a 2-22 record batting total against the Phils at Ebbets by going through his game logs.  Baseref's 8-30 splits at Shibe would mean he must have been 2-20 at home, if the 10-50 total is to be believed.

Meanwhile, Abrams had 21 PAs vs. the Phillies, and hit .176 (3-17).  He was 1-6 in the last two games.

Shuba made his final start June 13, a 5-3 loss to the Cubs that dropped Brooklyn to 28-20 (.583).  They were 61-45 the rest of the way (.575).

What makes this so strange are the Dodgers' splits for the games Hermanski played.  They finished the season with a fine 89-65 mark.  With Hermanski in the starting lineup, however, they were just 32-34.  Expanded to all games in which he appeared, the Brooks were 45-48.

Even so, Hermanski was clearly the team's best left fielder.  He was eight points higher with RISP than the team average, and he batted a sweet .333 (11-33) with RISP/2O.

Why was he sitting with righties on the mound and the season on the line?



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What were Abrams' last couple of games before the season ender? Was he on a mini hot streak of 3 or 4 games?

Hermanski wasn't the type of player you will find a bunch of small bits of info on........so you would have to Google newspapers of the days prior.........is that even doable?

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General Manager

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Also, remember we have all this data to go on..........in 1950 it was more of "gut feeling" and "playing hunches" by managers..........



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Umpire

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Date: February 7th
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Always fun data mining.

Hermanski was lifted for a PR in the 8th inning after hitting a Single of the 1st game of the Sept 29th double header with Boston. He did not play again that season. Maybe he injured himself running out the Single?



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Nitrous Oxide wrote:

Always fun data mining.

Hermanski was lifted for a PR in the 8th inning after hitting a Single of the 1st game of the Sept 29th double header with Boston. He did not play again that season. Maybe he injured himself running out the Single?


Could be.  Hammy, maybe?

I still find it interesting that his SABR Bio wouldn't mention it, given the importance of those games.  It must be something like that, though, because Abrams was hitting just .212 going into the final week, yet he played in each of the last six games.

Abrams' own baseref Bullpen page says nothing about it, and he has no SABR Bio entry.



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Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: February 7th
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nacster wrote:

What were Abrams' last couple of games before the season ender? Was he on a mini hot streak of 3 or 4 games?

Hermanski wasn't the type of player you will find a bunch of small bits of info on........so you would have to Google newspapers of the days prior.........is that even doable?


Not sure.  I checked the Google Newspaper Archive, and they don't have any Boston or New York (or Philadelphia) papers from the dates in question.

Of course, my check was limited to newspapers with any of those three cities' names in the title (Boston Globe, Boston Herald, New York Times, New York Daily News, New York Post, Philadelphia Inquirer, etc.).

There may be other papers in the area, but I'm not familiar with them.

I also googled Gene Hermanski 1950 injury, but nothing applicable came up.



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"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



VP of Operations

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Date: February 8th
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The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.

__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

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Date: February 8th
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seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



Season Ticket Holder - Upper Deck

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Date: February 8th
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I love the attention to detail and research you put into this.
I sometimes catch myself pursuing something, and when I back off a minute,
think to myself, am I the only one in the world interested in this.
Keep up the good work.


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VP of Operations

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Date: February 8th
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nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh


My seasons never vanish into thin air. wink

I like searching for odd stuff, like the details of what happened to Hermanski.  The comp game would remove him, but with no explanation.  I'm still at Square One.

I've always said that much of the fun is in what I learn from the reading/researching I do when I replay a season.  And those details give me a little something extra to chat about.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



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Date: February 8th
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tomthebomb wrote:

I love the attention to detail and research you put into this.
I sometimes catch myself pursuing something, and when I back off a minute,
think to myself, am I the only one in the world interested in this.
Keep up the good work.


Thanks.

I'll sometimes get halfway through what's going to be a humongous post about some minute detail, and I'll think the same thing.

But I always go in with an open mind, and the thought that -- even if it seems like everyone else knows about this -- I'm learning it for the first time.  There is a sense of magic to learning new things, and sharing them.

Okay, I haven't picked up on everything (Ted Williams actually trying to tinker with his approach, to combat the shift would be one), but I have more than 300 books, SABR pubs, Elysian Field Quarterly and other research materials, and I haven't read every one yet.

It's a long journey to enlightenment, with a multitude of forks in the road every step of the way.

As far as Hermanski is concerned, one question became several.  That a guy who posted a .304/.433/.502/.935 slash against right-handed pitching might still have to fight for his job the next Spring is astounding.  But I also learned he was holding out, and that might have cost him in the early going.

Okay, we have that piece of the puzzle.  But there are others.  Overall, the Dodgers were 54-45 in games against right-handed starting pitchers.  Why, then, were they so bad, specifically in the games Hermanski was in the lineup (32-35)?

The reason is obviously pitching.  June and July were their worst two months of the season, in terms of runs yielded.  Even so, they should have been better.

The Dodgers were 13-13 in June, and 15-14 in July.  Even with their worst mound efforts, though, they still scored 60 more runs than they surrendered, posting net positives in each month.

In June, for instance, they struggled to break even, despite scoring 41 more runs than they yielded in those 26 games!

One thing they did was shift Erv Palica from the pen to the rotation (something I missed when I was putting things together).  It didn't occur to me to look into Palica, since he had the third-most starts on the staff in '50, and he was there all year, meaning he didn't get called up from Montreal (or wherever) in midseason.

He was starting in my '48 season.  Had I known to look into his career record, I would have seen that he pitched out of the bullpen almost exclusively in '49, and was still there when the '50 season started.

Sometimes it seems like such simple stuff.  But, if you don't already know that you need to look there...

Ironically, if I had the '49 cards, I'd have known that. hmm

But I was already rolling '50 before we learned that '49 was going to be released.



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: February 8th
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seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh


My seasons never vanish into thin air. wink

I like searching for odd stuff, like the details of what happened to Hermanski.  The comp game would remove him, but with no explanation.  I'm still at Square One.

I've always said that much of the fun is in what I learn from the reading/researching I do when I replay a season.  And those details give me a little something extra to chat about.


 I have no snappy comeback to that LOL..........



__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16185
Date: February 8th
Permalink  
 

nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh


My seasons never vanish into thin air. wink

I like searching for odd stuff, like the details of what happened to Hermanski.  The comp game would remove him, but with no explanation.  I'm still at Square One.

I've always said that much of the fun is in what I learn from the reading/researching I do when I replay a season.  And those details give me a little something extra to chat about.


 I have no snappy comeback to that LOL..........


In all seriousness, that has to be incredibly disheartening, to see something like that happen.

I know that much, because I lost about 10 years' worth of archived e-mail exchanges, including the note I received from Hal, when he responded personally to pics of Strat Park that I sent.

It's not like losing a hand-written (or typed) note on paper, but it's as close as the modern age will let us get.

I always archive correspondence, in case I want to refer back to what someone may have said once.  All of my replay posts, and much of my other key stuff, are also archived, in a drafts file.  Sites may go away, or get overrun by porn bots, but I can always find a new place to re-post my replays.

Now, of course, we also have everything backed up. wink



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."



General Manager

Status: Online
Posts: 13508
Date: February 8th
Permalink  
 

seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh


My seasons never vanish into thin air. wink

I like searching for odd stuff, like the details of what happened to Hermanski.  The comp game would remove him, but with no explanation.  I'm still at Square One.

I've always said that much of the fun is in what I learn from the reading/researching I do when I replay a season.  And those details give me a little something extra to chat about.


 I have no snappy comeback to that LOL..........


In all seriousness, that has to be incredibly disheartening, to see something like that happen.

I know that much, because I lost about 10 years' worth of archived e-mail exchanges, including the note I received from Hal, when he responded personally to pics of Strat Park that I sent.

It's not like losing a hand-written (or typed) note on paper, but it's as close as the modern age will let us get.

I always archive correspondence, in case I want to refer back to what someone may have said once.  All of my replay posts, and much of my other key stuff, are also archived, in a drafts file.  Sites may go away, or get overrun by porn bots, but I can always find a new place to re-post my replays.

Now, of course, we also have everything backed up. wink


 One good thing is.........with the help of Colavito Fan, I know the root of any computer problem I might run in to.  The key is to never have more then one SOM window open.

So say for example........when I go to post the daily standings and summaries, if I go and open a new game without first closing that browser tab with the daily stuff on it, that is when one of the leagues standings go haywire.  Now you can go back and delete the offending problem, but it is VERY hard to find the root of the issue (usually it is as simple as just deleting the last game played, but sometimes it is more complicated then that).  So before I start another day's games after I post the summaries, I make ABSOLUTELY sure I have that extra tab closed.  

This does mean that you cannot play two games at one time, which is something that C&D guys can do with ease, especially on the final day of a replay with bunched standings.....



-- Edited by nacster on Wednesday 8th of February 2017 05:07:11 PM

__________________

"NACSTER'S HISTORICAL REPLAY"

34 REPLAYS IN THE BOOKS!

1876-1883

1896-1900

1906

1916-1917

1921, 1929

1936-1937

1943, 1946

1956-1963

1976

1986

1991, 1996

37,117 regular season games through 34 replays!

 

 



VP of Operations

Status: Offline
Posts: 16185
Date: February 8th
Permalink  
 

nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:
nacster wrote:
seajaw wrote:

The main reason why this seems to be an oddly big deal is because I like to use transactions.

But I also like to go through the game logs and check on guys who miss a significant number of games, to see if those games missed indicate an injury.

For instance, if a regular starter is out for 10 or more consecutive games, I assume he was probably on the DL. I will remove him from my active roster for an appropriate number of games about that same time of the season. I will also limit his games missed due to any die-rolled injury when he does play.

Another example is 1950 Ted Williams, who was injured in the All-Star Game and missed the rest of the season. I intend to recreate those circumstances. It would be unfair to utilize his PAs in such a way that I could have him in the lineup down the stretch. He'll get all of his allotted playing time in the first half.

If I were playing the '73 season, I would try as much as possible to approximate the same stretches of the season various Mets' players missed so many games. That way, I can avoid cherry-picking what games I want them available, and play it like it was the real '73 campaign.

It's the same theory as when you call up a guy who spends part of the year in the minors. Limit his games to when he was actually there, as much as possible.


 LOL...........the comp game does that for you.........bleh


My seasons never vanish into thin air. wink

I like searching for odd stuff, like the details of what happened to Hermanski.  The comp game would remove him, but with no explanation.  I'm still at Square One.

I've always said that much of the fun is in what I learn from the reading/researching I do when I replay a season.  And those details give me a little something extra to chat about.


 I have no snappy comeback to that LOL..........


In all seriousness, that has to be incredibly disheartening, to see something like that happen.

I know that much, because I lost about 10 years' worth of archived e-mail exchanges, including the note I received from Hal, when he responded personally to pics of Strat Park that I sent.

It's not like losing a hand-written (or typed) note on paper, but it's as close as the modern age will let us get.

I always archive correspondence, in case I want to refer back to what someone may have said once.  All of my replay posts, and much of my other key stuff, are also archived, in a drafts file.  Sites may go away, or get overrun by porn bots, but I can always find a new place to re-post my replays.

Now, of course, we also have everything backed up. wink


 One good thing is.........with the help of Colavito Fan, I know the root of any computer problem I might run in to.  The key is to never have more then one SOM window open.

So say for example........when I go to post the daily standings and summaries, if I go and open a new game without first closing that browser tab with the daily stuff on it, that is when one of the leagues standings go haywire.  Now you can go back and delete the offending problem, but it is VERY hard to find the root of the issue (usually it is as simple as just deleting the last game played, but sometimes it is more complicated then that).  So before I start another day's games after I post the summaries, I make ABSOLUTELY sure I have that extra tab closed.  

This does mean that you cannot play two games at one time, which is something that C&D guys can do with ease, especially on the final day of a replay with bunched standings.....



-- Edited by nacster on Wednesday 8th of February 2017 05:07:11 PM


Exactly!

I actually still have Strat Park II available (my current park is SPIII), for situations such as my 1938 replay season-enders, where both leagues' races came down to the final day.

In the A.L., for instance, I rolled the Yankees' and Indians' finales, I rolled them (somewhat) simultaneously (allowing for time differences).

It was just like being able to follow the out-of-town scoreboards as the game progressed.

It can definitely influence in-game strategies.  For instance, if your competitor for the flag is leading in their game, and you are down by a run or two in yours, you may be willing to make riskier moves earlier than you might otherwise.

Or, upon finding that your competitor has clinch the flag, you can empty the bench.  I like applying little touches like that.

Also, I'm glad you found the help you were seeking (don't take that the wrong way... biggrin).



__________________

"No cell, no car, no credit cards, he's sixty-plus and gray...
Just sitting in his basement, with a Strat game underway."

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